wildlife and humans

Legacy ID: 
6 194
Publication Title: 

Factors affecting defensive strike behavior in Brown Treesnakes provoked by humans

Authors: 
Spencer, M.M. R.N. Reed, B. Lardner, M.J. Mazurek, L.R. Bonewell
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2013-12-30
Parent Publication Title: 
Brown Tree Snake Technical Meeting, Yigo, Guam, December 5, 2013
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0072 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

A survey of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees regarding constraints to connecting children with nature—Summary report to respondents

Authors: 
Ratz, J.M. and R.M. Schuster
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2011-02-16
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0012 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

This report provides a summary of responses to the questions included on a survey of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees regarding constraints to connecting children with nature. The survey was sponsored by the Division of Education Outreach at the National Conservation Training Center and conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey. The data collection process started on February 25, 2010 and ended on March 9, 2010. The dataset includes the responses from 320 individuals from all regions in the Service. The adjusted response rate for the survey was 55 percent. In this report, we provide the summary results for the survey questions in the order in which the questions were asked...

Publication Title: 

Use of wildlife webcams—Literature review and annotated bibliography

Authors: 
Ratz, J.M. and S.J. Conk
Publication Date: 
2010
Updated Date (text): 
2011-01-05
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2010/0103 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center requested a literature review product that would serve as a resource to natural resource professionals interested in using webcams to connect people with nature. The literature review focused on the effects on the public of viewing wildlife through webcams and on information regarding installation and use of webcams. We searched the peer reviewed, published literature for three topics: wildlife cameras, virtual tourism, and technological nature. Very few publications directly addressed the effect of viewing wildlife webcams. The review of information on installation and use of cameras yielded information about many aspects of the use of remote photography, but not much specifically regarding webcams. Aspects of wildlife camera use covered in the literature review include: camera options, image retrieval, system maintenance and monitoring, time to assemble, power source, light source, camera mount, frequency of image recording, consequences for animals, and equipment security. Webcam technology is relatively new and more publication regarding the use of the technology is needed. Future research should specifically study the effect that viewing wildlife through webcams has on the viewers’ conservation attitudes, behaviors, and sense of connectedness to nature.

Publication Title: 

Ecology of commensual bats in relation to rabies transmission: excerpts of the Fort Collins study, 2001-2005

Authors: 
O'Shea, T.J., R.A. Bowen, and C.E. Rupperecht
Publication Date: 
2006
Updated Date (text): 
2010-12-14
Parent Publication Title: 
Interaction of Society and the Environment Seminar Series, November 2, 2006
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2006-0103 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

A human-dimensions review of human-wildlife disturbance: a literature review of impacts, frameworks, and management solutions

Authors: 
Cline, R., N. Sexton, and S.C. Stewart
Publication Date: 
2007
Updated Date (text): 
2009-05-06
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2007/0051 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

The following report was prepared for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Refuge System in support of their Comprehensive Conservation Planning (CCP) efforts by the Policy Analysis and Science Assistance Branch (PASA), Fort Collins Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey. While this document provides a summary of contemporary recreation management literature and methodologies, relevant to the subject of managing wildlife disturbances on national wildlife refuges, this document should be viewed as a starting point for management administrators. This document identifies general issues relating to wildlife disturbance and visitor impacts including a description of disturbance, recreational impacts, related human dimensions applications, management frameworks, and a general summary of management solutions. The section on descriptions of wildlife disturbance and impacts draws heavily from the report entitled "Managing the Impacts of Visitor Use on Waterbirds -- A Literature Review of Impacts and Mitigation" (DeLong, 2002; Delong and Adamcik, in press) and is referenced in the text. This document is more comprehensive in its review of wildlife response to disturbance. This document is intended to discuss the human-dimensions aspect of wildlife disturbance, summarizing human dimensions and recreation management literature as it applies to this topic.

Publication Title: 

An integrated model of human-wildlife interdependence

Authors: 
John, K., R.G. Walsh, and R.L. Johnson
Publication Date: 
1994
Updated Date (text): 
2004-03-15
Parent Publication Title: 
Ecological Economics
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
1994/0099 MESC

Pub Abstract: 

This paper attempts to integrate wildlife-related ecologic and economic variables into an econometric model. The model reveals empirical evidence of the presumed interdependence of human-wildlife and the holistic nature of humanitys relationship to the ecosystem. Human use of biologic resources varies not only with income, education, and population, but also with sustainability of humankinds action relative to the quality and quantity of the supporting ecological base.

Development of a Reference Handbook on Plague for the National Park Service

Code: 
RB00CN9.7.0
Abstract: 

Plague is an exotic and potentially fatal zoonotic disease. Since its introduction to the United States around 1900, at least 25 National Park Service (NPS) units in three regions have reported evidence of plague in wildlife. Within the last two years, two NPS units have conducted investigations of human plague cases. Although management to protect humans and wildlife from plague has been conducted in some NPS units, there is currently no bureau-wide plague management guidance document. Working with NPS, FORT scientists developed a handbook to serve as an informational reference summarizing what is currently known about plague ecology, including the most pertinent plague literature, management options, policy, and procedures as these pertain to NPS units. Although the handbook is an internal administrative report for NPS managers and decisionmakers, the literature search conducted during this project is available as a USGS Open-File Report bibliography: see A bibliography of literature pertaining to plague (Yersinia pestis). Because plague is an emerging disease in certain portions of North America and knowledge of the disease continues to expand, these documents will be updated regularly.

Perceptions, Values, and Knowledge of Wildlife Disease and Human/Wildlife Interactions

Code: 
8327CME.1.0
Abstract: 

Managers need to understand how to best collaborate and communicate with the general public about wildlife disease and the interactions between humans and wildlife. Concern for human risk due to wildlife disease (e.g., chronic wasting disease, avian influenza, West Nile disease, plague) has grown in recent years. With growth in human population and global interconnectivity, in addition to increasing ecotourism and outdoor recreation, humans find themselves sharing more space with wildlife. It is important to understand the socioeconomic considerations and societal implications of these human-wildlife interactions. Specific objectives of this task include measuring human perceptions, values, and knowledge of wildlife disease and human-wildlife interactions. Current research includes a study to understand public perceptions and knowledge of bats and rabies by residents of Fort Collins, Colorado. Other research has involved the human dimensions aspects of bears and avian influenza. Clients for this research include the National Science Foundation and State and county public health officials.

Implementation of a Monitoring Plan for Vegetation Responses to New Elk Management in Rocky Mountain National Park

Code: 
8327CMW.4.0
Abstract: 

Rocky Mountain National Park and agencies responsible for management of natural resources adjacent to the park are developing and evaluating alternatives for managing elk and vegetation on these lands. The goal of this planning effort is to reduce the adverse effects of elk herbivory on vegetation and decrease conflicts between people and elk. To this end, FORT scientists are designing and implementing a monitoring plan for the park that will help them assess the effectiveness of their management actions and adapt those actions, when and where necessary, to continue achieving the management plan’s intended goals.

Mountain Lion Ecology

Code: 
832797T.3.0
Abstract: 

As a charismatic predator, mountain lions top the list of national park management challenges that require balancing the preservation of species with protection of park visitors. In Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) and its environs, FORT scientists are collaborating with the Colorado Division of Wildlife and RMNP personnel to determine the abundance, distribution, and ecology of mountain lions. They are also investigating whether these animals are selectively preying on CWD-positive deer and elk. Field work includes testing and evaluating invasive (new traps) and noninvasive (baiting, call boxes, and camera traps) techniques for tracking and understanding mountain lion behavior. Park managers will use study results to more safely manage human/mountain lion interactions. Results will also be valuable to managers in other parks frequented by mountain lions or internationally, for managing other big cats.