wildfire

Legacy ID: 
6 185
Publication Title: 

Unsupported inferences of high-severity fire in historical dry forests of the western United States: response to Williams and Baker

Authors: 
Fulé, P.Z., T.W. Swetnam, P.M. Brown, D.A. Falk, D.L. Peterson, C.D. Allen, G.H. Aplet, M.A. Battaglia, D. Binkley, C. Farris, R.E. Keane, E.Q. Margolis, H. Grissino-Mayer, C. Miller, C. Hull Sieg, C. Skinner, S.L. Stephens, and A. Taylor
Publication Date: 
2014
Parent Publication Title: 
Global Ecology and Biogeography
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2014/0090 FORT
Species: 

Pub Abstract: 

Reconstructions of dry western US forests in the late 19th century in Arizona, Colorado and Oregon based on General Land Office records were used by Williams & Baker (2012; Global Ecology and Biogeography, 21, 1042–1052; hereafter W&B) to infer past fire regimes with substantial moderate and high-severity burning. The authors concluded that present-day large, high-severity fires are not distinguishable from historical patterns. We present evidence of important errors in their study. First, the use of tree size distributions to reconstruct past fire severity and extent is not supported by empirical age–size relationships nor by studies that directly quantified disturbance history in these forests. Second, the fire severity classification of W&B is qualitatively different from most modern classification schemes, and is based on different types of data, leading to an inappropriate comparison. Third, we note that while W&B asserted ‘surprising’ heterogeneity in their reconstructions of stand density and species composition, their data are not substantially different from many previous studies which reached very different conclusions about subsequent forest and fire behaviour changes. Contrary to the conclusions of W&B, the preponderance of scientific evidence indicates that conservation of dry forest ecosystems in the western United States and their ecological, social and economic value is not consistent with a present-day disturbance regime of large, high-severity fires, especially under changing climate.

Publication Title: 

Valuing morbidity from wildfire smoke exposure: a comparison of revealed and stated preference techniques

Authors: 
Richardson, L., J.B. Loomis, and P.A. Champ
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2013-03-28
Parent Publication Title: 
Land Economics
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
NONCTR/00393
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Statement of Dr. Craig D. Allen, U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior, before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, U.S. Senate, 17 August 2012

Authors: 
Allen, C.D
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2013-05-03
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0143 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

The hidden cost of wildfires: Economic valuation of health effects of wildfire smoke exposure in Southern California

Authors: 
Richardson, L., P. Champ, and J. Loomis
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2012-04-24
Parent Publication Title: 
Journal of Forest Economics
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0024 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Environmental and health-hazards characterization of airfall ash, residual ash, and soils from areas burned by 2007-2009 southern California wildfires at the wildland-urban-agricultural interface

Authors: 
Plumlee, G.S., T.M. Hoefen, S.A. Morman, P.L. Hageman, D.A. Martin, R. Kokaly, R.E. Wolf, H.A. Lowers, J.M. Holloway, W.M. Benzel, G.P Meeker, C.A. Stricker
Publication Date: 
2010
Updated Date (text): 
2012-05-30
Parent Publication Title: 
Southern California Academy of Sciences 2010 7-8 May 2010
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2010/0128 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Environmental and health-hazards characteristic of airfall ash, residual ash, and soils from areas burned by fifteen 2007-2010 California and Colorado wildfires at the wildland-urban interface

Authors: 
Plumlee, G.S., T.M. Hoefen, S.A. Morman, P.L. Hageman, D.A. Martin, R. Kokaly, R.E. Wolf, H.A. Lowers, J.M. Holloway, G.A. Swayze, W.M. Benzel, G.P Meeker, C.A. Stricker
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2012-05-30
Parent Publication Title: 
American Chemical Society Fall 2011 National Meeting & Exposition Denver, CO 28 Aug - 1 Sept
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0136 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Effect of fire on soil carbon and nitrogen

Authors: 
Holloway, J.M., C.A. Stricker, G.S. Plumlee, and T.M. Hoefen
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2011-12-14
Parent Publication Title: 
American Chemical Society Fall 2011 National Meeting & Exposition Denver, CO 28 Aug - 1 Sept
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0137 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Past fires shed light on future

Authors: 
Allen, C.D
Publication Date: 
1999
Updated Date (text): 
2008-06-16
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
1999/0131 MESC
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

Wildfires are often viewed as hazards to people, property, and wildlife. However, scientists at the Fort Collins Science Center (FORT), Biological Resources Discipline, U.S. Geological Survey and their colleagues from the University of Arizona's Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research are gaining new insights on the role of fire in maintaining healthy forest ecosystems.

During the past eight years, scientists have sampled and dated over 3,300 fire scars from about 400 trees, snags, logs, and stumps in the Jemez and Sangre de Cristo Mountains of northern New Mexico to help define the natural range of variability among fires. Specifically, scientists are investigating historical fire frequencies, extent, seasonalities (when fires are most likely to burn), and intensities, and comparing them to current fire regimes...

Publication Title: 

Taking the long view: Using satellite images to assess wildfire effects

Authors: 
Haire, S. and J. Wilson
Publication Date: 
2001
Updated Date (text): 
2008-09-23
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2001/0088 MESC

Pub Abstract: 

The year 2000 fire season heightened concern that decades of fire suppression may have lead to larger, more severe wildfires. But in nature, is this unusual? What are the various ecological effects caused by fires of different severity, or even by the variation in severity within particular burns? How do we learn about these effects on a landscape scale? To find out, USGS and National Park Service scientists are looking at fire effects from a unique perspective: Space.

Studies of fire effects on plant and animal communities are currently hindered by the limited availability of standardized, quantitative maps of burn-severity patterns. Remote sensing technologies, such as satellite images, may allow the consistent comparison among sites that this research requires. Where fire size, remoteness, and rugged terrain make alternative methods impractical, remote sensing technologies are highly effective in assessing and monitoring wildfires and their effects...

Publication Title: 

Fire history and ecology

Authors: 
Allen, C.D
Publication Date: 
2001
Updated Date (text): 
2008-06-02
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2001/0085 MESC
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

Sometimes one has to look backward in order to move forward. This is certainly the case with wildfire. As land managers grapple with the complexity of issues accompanying ecosystem restoration and management, fire histories can help them understand natural fire regimes and how they affected and maintained wildland ecosystems before Europeans settled the American West.

Working with collaborators Tom Swetnam of the University of Arizona Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, Scott Anderson of Northern Arizona University, and others, USGS scientist Craig Allen has been developing landscape-level fire histories in the Jemez and Sangre de Cristo Mountains of northern New Mexico. These histories are compiled using charcoal deposits from bogs, historic fire suppression records, and tree-ring reconstructions of fire and precipitation. Allen also conducts collaborative research on the ecology of modern fires, including follow-up studies on the effects of the 1977 La Mesa Fire and ongoing work on tree growth, nitrogen-cycle/fire interactions, and fire effects on elk and Mexican spotted owls...

Pages