semiarid ecosystems

Legacy ID: 
4 891
Publication Title: 

Influence of nonnative and native ungulate biomass and seasonal precipitation on vegetation production in a great basin ecosystem

Authors: 
Zeigenfuss, L.C., K.A. Schoenecker, J.I. Ransom, D.A. Ignizio and T. Mask
Publication Date: 
2014
Parent Publication Title: 
Western North American Naturalist
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2014/0089 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

The negative effects of equid grazers in semiarid ecosystems of the American West have been considered disproportionate to the influence of native ungulates in these systems because of equids’ large body size, hoof shape, and short history on the landscape relative to native ungulates. Tools that can analyze the degree of influence of various ungulate herbivores in an ecosystem and separate effects of ungulates from effects of other variables (climate, anthropomorphic disturbances) can be useful to managers in determining the location of nonnative herbivore impacts and assessing the effect of management actions targeted at different ungulate populations. We used remotely sensed data to determine the influence of native and nonnative ungulates and climate on vegetation productivity at wildlife refuges in Oregon and Nevada. Our findings indicate that ungulate biomass density, particularly equid biomass density, and precipitation in winter and spring had the greatest influence on normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values. Our results concur with those of other researchers, who found that drought exacerbated the impacts of ungulate herbivores in arid systems.

Publication Title: 

Potential role of cryptobiotic soil crusts in semiarid rangelands

Authors: 
Belnap, J
Publication Date: 
1995
Updated Date (text): 
2012-08-29
Parent Publication Title: 
Symposium on Ecology, Management, and Restoration of Intermountain Annual Rangelands, U.S. Forest Service, General Technical Report INT-GTR-313
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
1995/0172 MESC

Pub Abstract: 

The role of cryptobiotic soil crusts in the functioning of semiarid and arid ecosystems is discussed. These roles include microstructuring of soils in cold-desert ecosystems, influencing soil nutrient levels, and influencing the nutrient status, germination, and establishment of vascular plants in crusted areas when compared to uncrusted areas. For these reasons, re-establishment of these crusts should be an important part of reclamation efforts. Natural recovery rates and the effectiveness of inoculation efforts are discussed.