Rocky Mountains

Legacy ID: 
4 702
Publication Title: 

Spatial and temporal analysis of drought impacts on semi-arid woodlands

Authors: 
Assal, T.J. and J. Sibold
Publication Date: 
2014
Parent Publication Title: 
ForestSAT 2014, November 4-7, 2014, Riva del Garda, Italy
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
NONCTR/00410

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

The past as prelude to the future for understanding 21st-century climate effects on rocky mountain trout

Authors: 
Isaak, D.J., C.C. Muhlfeld, A.S. Todd, R. Al-chokhachy, J. Roberts, J.L. Kershner, K.D. Fausch, and S.W. Hostetler
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2013-05-07
Parent Publication Title: 
Fisheries
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
NONCTR/00397

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Symposium 9: Rocky Mountain Futures: Preserving, Utilizing, and Sustaining Rocky Mountain Ecosystems

Authors: 
Baron, J.S., T. Seastedt, D. Fagre, J. Hicke, D. Tomback, E. Garcia, Z. Bowen, and J.A. Logan
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2013-01-30
Parent Publication Title: 
Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0038 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

In 2002 we published Rocky Mountain Futures, an Ecological Perspective (Island Press) to examine the cumulative ecological effects of human activity in the Rocky Mountains. We concluded  that multiple local activities concerning land use, hydrologic manipulation, and resource extraction have altered ecosystems, although there were examples where the “tyranny of small decisions” worked in a positive way toward more sustainable coupled human/environment interactions. Superimposed on local change was climate change, atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and other pollutants, regional population growth, and some national management policies such as fire suppression.

Publication Title: 

Transfer of trace metals from streams to terrestrial food webs by emerging aquatic insects in mineralized alpine ecosystems

Authors: 
Kraus, J.M., R.B. Wanty, T.S. Schmidt, D.M. Walters, and C.A. Stricker
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2012-01-03
Parent Publication Title: 
Rocky Mountain Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, May 19-20, 2011, Denver, Colorado
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
NONCTR/00347

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Ecological effects of Didymosphenia geminata in macroinvertebrate communities of the central Colorado Rocky Mountains

Authors: 
Schmidt, T.S., R.B. Wanty, P.L. Verplanck, S.E. Church, D.L. Fey, M. Adams, S.A. Spaulding, S. Russell, and W.H. Clements
Publication Date: 
2006
Updated Date (text): 
2011-10-07
Parent Publication Title: 
Rocky Mountain Chapter of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, April 27-28, 2006, Idaho Springs, Colorado, USA
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
NONCTR/00331
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Assessing forest vulnerability and the potential distribution of pine beetles under current and future climate scenarios in the Interior West of the US

Authors: 
Evangelista, P.H., S. Kumar, T.J. Stohlgren, and N.E. Young
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2011-10-04
Parent Publication Title: 
Forest Ecology and Management
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0060 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Inland surface water [Chapter 18]

Authors: 
Baron, J.S., C.T. Driscoll, and J.L. Stoddard
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2012-06-28
Parent Publication Title: 
Assessment of N deposition effects and empirical critical loads of N for ecoregions of the United States
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0088 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

18.1 Ecosystems Description

Freshwater aquatic ecosystems include rivers and streams, large and small lakes, reservoirs, and ephemeral ponds. Wetlands are defined and discussed in Chapter 17 of this report. It is estimated that there are 123,400 lakes with a surface area greater than 4 ha in the United States. Most lakes, however, are smaller than 4 ha; small lakes account for the majority of lake surface area both globally and in the United States (Table 18.1; Downing et al. 2006). The density of lakes varies greatly by region of the country, from 8.4 lakes per 100 km2 in the upper Midwest and 7.8 lakes per 100 km2 in Florida, to much lower values in other areas of the country (e.g., mid-Atlantic, Southeast, and West <1.0 lakes per 100 km2) ( Eilers and Selle 1991). The cumulative surface area of these lakes is approximately 9.5 million ha. The U.S. Geologic Survey's National Hydrographic Dataset (NHD) estimates that there are approximately 1.1 million km of perennial flowing streams in the United States. Of these about 91 percent are first through fourth order (“wadeable”) (US EPA 2006).

Publication Title: 

Northwestern forested mountains [Chapter 8]

Authors: 
Bowman, W.D., J.S. Baron, L. Geiser, M.E. Fenn, and E.A. Lilleskov
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2012-06-28
Parent Publication Title: 
Assessment of N deposition effects and empirical critical loads of N for ecoregions of the United States
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0086 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

8.1 Ecoregion Description

The Northwestern Forested Mountains are ecologically diverse and geographically widespread, encompassing the mountain ecosystems of central and northwestern North America (CEC 1997; Figure 2.2). The ecoregion description is adapted from CEC (1997). Geographically, they extend from the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada north through the Siskiyous, the east side of the Cascade Range, and then east of the Coast Ranges to interior Alaska. Climatically, the region is characterized by a transition from a moist, maritime climate in the northwest, to a continental and drier climate in the Rockies in the southeast. Orographically generated rainfall creates both rain shadows and wet belts, often in close proximity.

The vegetation of the ecoregion is extremely diverse, with distinct community zonation occurring along elevation gradients. Alpine communities at the highest elevations contain various forb, lichen, and shrub associations. Subalpine communities include lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa), Pacific silver fir (Abies amabilis), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii). Mid-elevation forests are characterized by ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca), lodgepole pine, and quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) in the east, and by western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla), western red cedar (Thuja plicata), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), and western white pine (Pinus monticola) in the west and southwest. White and black spruce (Picea glauca and P. mariana) dominate the Alaskan portion of the ecoregion. Vegetation of the interior valleys in the southern portion of the region includes big sagebrush
(Artemisia tridentate), rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus spp.), and antelope bitterbrush (Purshia tridentate).

Publication Title: 

Complex Patterns in Climate and Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition Influence: Rocky Mountain Ecosystems

Authors: 
Baron, J.S., T.S. Schmidt, M.D. Hartman, S.K. Enders, M. Pagani, A.P. Wolfe, and A. Krcmarik
Publication Date: 
2007
Updated Date (text): 
2012-01-09
Parent Publication Title: 
American Geophysical Union Annual Meeting: Dec 10-14, 2007, San Francisco, CA
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2007/0167 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Ecological condition of streams in the southern Rocky Mountains, based on periphyton

Authors: 
Spaulding, S., P.Y. Don, J. Stevenson, K. Hermann, and P. Larsen
Publication Date: 
2006
Updated Date (text): 
2010-02-17
Parent Publication Title: 
2006 Western Division Annual Meeting: Natives and Newcomers - Bozeman, MT, May 15-19
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2006/0191 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

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