restoration

Legacy ID: 
4 572
Publication Title: 

Can Nitrogen fertilization aid restoration of mature tree productivity in degraded dryland riverine ecosystems?

Authors: 
Andersen, D.C., E.C. Adair, S.M. Nelson, and D. Binkley
Publication Date: 
2014
Parent Publication Title: 
Restoration Ecology
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2014/0050 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

Restoration of riparian forest productivity lost as a consequence of flow regulation is a common management goal in dryland riverine ecosystems. In the northern hemisphere, dryland river floodplain trees often include one or another species of Populus, which are fast-growing, nutrient-demanding trees. Because the trees are phreatophytic in drylands, and have water needs met in whole or in part by a shallow water table, their productivity may be limited by nitrogen (N) availability, which commonly limits primary productivity in mesic environments. We added 20 g N m−2 in a 2-m radius around the base of mature Populus fremontii along each of a regulated and free-flowing river in semiarid northwest Colorado, USA (total n = 42) in order to test whether growth is constrained by low soil N. Twelve years after fertilization, we collected increment cores from these and matched unfertilized trees and compared radial growth ratios (growth in the 3-year post-fertilization period/growth in the 3-year pre-fertilization period) in paired t tests. We expected a higher mean ratio in the fertilized trees. No effect from fertilization was detected, nor was a trend evident on either river. An alternative test using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) produced a similar result. Our results underscore the need for additional assessment of which and to what extent factors other than water control dryland riverine productivity. Positive confirmation of adequate soil nutrients at these and other dryland riparian sites would bolster the argument that flow management is necessary and sufficient to maximize productivity and enhance resilience in affected desert riverine forests.

Publication Title: 

Grazing effects on aboveground primary production and root biomass of earlyseral, mid-seral, and undisturbed semiarid grassland

Authors: 
Milchunas, D.G., and M.W. Vandever
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2013-04-04
Parent Publication Title: 
Journal of Arid Environments
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0012 FORT
Species: 
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

The Watts Branch Restoration Project: restoring a stream, restoring a community-urban watershed restoration fosters community improvement

Authors: 
Cullinane Thomas, C. and E. Myrick
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2013-05-03
Parent Publication Title: 
NRDA Restoration Program/BLM socioeconomic group case studies
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0009 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

The Watts Branch restoration project is one of a set of case studies highlighting the economic impacts of restoration projects supported by the Department of the Interior. This document includes the Watts Branch restoration case study as well as an overview of the methods used for the case study analyses. Additional case studies can be found in the 2011 Economic Impacts of the Department of the Interior’s Programs and Activities report (pages 76‐89).

Publication Title: 

Forty years of vegetation change on the Missouri River floodplain

Authors: 
Johnson, W.C., M.D. Dixon, M.L. Scott, L. Rabbe, G. Larson, M. Volke, and B. Werner
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2013-05-03
Parent Publication Title: 
BioScience
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0028 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Comparative inventories in 1969 and 1970 and in 2008 of vegetation from 30 forest stands downstream of Garrison Dam on the Missouri River in central North Dakota showed (a) a sharp decline in Cottonwood regeneration; (b) a strong compositional shift toward dominance by green ash; and (c) large increases in invasive understory species, such as smooth brome, reed canary grass, and Canada thistle. These changes, and others discovered during remeasurement, have been caused by a complex of factors, some related to damming (altered hydrologic and sediment regimes, delta formation, and associated wet—dry cycles) and some not (diseases and expansion of invasive plants). Dominance of green ash, however, may be short lived, given the likelihood that the emerald ash borer will arrive in the Dakotas in 5–10 years, with potentially devastating effects. The prospects for recovery of this valuable ecosystem, rich in ecosystem goods and services and in American history, are daunting.

Publication Title: 

Ecosystem restoration [Chapter 4]

Authors: 
Cullinane Thomas, C.M., K.E. Skrabis, and W. Gascoigne
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2012-07-13
Parent Publication Title: 
The Department of Interior's Economic Contributions, FY2011
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0068 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Department of the Interior plays a substantial role in the U.S. economy, supporting over two million jobs and approximately $385 billion in economic activity for 2011. American citizens and industry, at work and at play, all benefit from Interior’s natural and cultural resource management: maintaining lands for recreation, protecting cultural and historical resources, storing and conveying water, generating power, leasing mineral rights, and providing valuable information to mineral markets.

Highlights of Interior’s economic contributions to key economic sectors in 2011 include:

  • Recreation and Tourism: Americans and foreign visitors made nearly 435 million visits to Interior-managed lands. These visits supported over 403,000 jobs and contributed around $48.7 billion in economic activity. This economic output represents about 6.5% of the direct output of tourism-related personal consumption expenditures for the United States for 2011 and about 7.6% of the direct tourism related employment.
  • Energy and Minerals: Exploitation of oil, gas, coal, hydropower and other minerals on Federal lands supported 1.5 million jobs and $275 billion in economic activity.
  • Water, Timber and Forage: Use of water, timber and other resources produced from Federal lands supported about 290,000 jobs and nearly $41 billion in economic activity.
  • Grants and Payments: Interior administers numerous grants and payments, supporting programs across the country and improving Federal lands with projects ranging from reclaiming abandoned mines to building coastal infrastructure. $4.2 billion in grants and payments (including support to tribal governments) supported about 83,000 jobs and $10 billion worth of economic contributions.
  • Interior’s support for tribal governments is an important mechanism for advancing nation-to-nation relationships, improving Indian education, and improving the safety of Indian communities. In FY 2011, this funding contributed about $1.2 billion to economic output and supported about 9,500 jobs.
  • Through both bureau programs and organizational partnerships, more than 21,000 employment opportunities were provided to people ages 15 to 25 on public lands in FY 2011. NPS and its organizational partners employed the largest number, with 9,089 youth employed.
  • The physical infrastructure managed by Interior supports a wide variety of resource management and recreation activities. In FY 2011, investments in construction and maintenance totaled about $2.6 billion. This funding contributed about $7.2 billion in economic activity and supported about 49,000 jobs.
  • Land acquisitions are a key component to ensuring that the ecosystem services provided by Interior-managed lands can be preserved and enhanced. The $144 million spent on land acquisitions in FY 2011 is estimated to contribute about $141 million in economic activity and support about 1,000 jobs.

Some of the valuable services produced under Interior’s management cannot be fully counted in terms of output or jobs: habitat for a wide variety of species, drinking water, energy security, flood and disease control, scientific information, carbon sequestration, recreation, and culture. Evaluation and consideration of the services provided through human production and through land and resource conservation can engage new stakeholders, expand revenue sources, and enhance our landscapes.

Publication Title: 

Riparian restoration in the context of Tamarix control [chapter 23]

Authors: 
Shafroth, P.B., D.M. Merritt, M.K. Briggs, V.B. Beauchamp, K.D. Lair, M.L. Scott, and A.A. Sher
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2013-04-29
Parent Publication Title: 
Tamarix: a case study of ecological change in the American West
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0022 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Bill Williams River environmental flow program: lessons learned and future challenges

Authors: 
Shafroth, P.B
Publication Date: 
2010
Updated Date (text): 
2011-10-04
Parent Publication Title: 
Restoring Rivers in the Southwestern U.S. and Northern Mexico, Tucson, AZ, December 7-9, 2010
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2010/0115 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Conservation of Greater Sage-Grouse: A synthesis of current trends and future management

Authors: 
Connelly, J.W., S.T. Knick, C.E. Braun, W.L. Baker, E.A. Beever, T. Christiansen, K.E. Doherty, E.O. Garton, S.E. Hanser, D.H. Johnson, M. Leu, R.F. Miller, D.E. Naugle, S.J. Oyler-McCance, et al
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2012-08-10
Parent Publication Title: 
Greater Sage-Grouse: Ecology and conservation of a landscape species and habitats
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0048 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Recent analysis of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) populations indicate substantial declines in many areas but relatively stable population in other portions of the species’ range. Sagebrush (Artemisia app.) habitats necessary to support sage-grouse are being burned by large wildlife, invaded by nonnative plants, and developed for energy resources (gas, oil, and wind). Management on public lands, which contain 70% of sagebrush habitats, has changed over the last 30 years from large sagebrush control projects directed at enhancing livestock grazing to a greater emphasis on projects that often attempt to improve or restore ecological integrity…

Publication Title: 

Quantile equivalence for evaluating habitat management or restoration objectives

Authors: 
Cade, B.S
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2011-04-05
Parent Publication Title: 
96th Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting, August 7-12, 2011, Austin, Texas
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0184 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Restoration of the razorback sucker in the Colorado River, southwestern United States

Authors: 
Mueller, G
Publication Date: 
1997
Updated Date (text): 
2010-04-22
Parent Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the World River Conference, November 19-20, Gifu, Japan
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
1997/0142 MESC

Pub Abstract: 

Pages