regulated rivers

Legacy ID: 
4 482
Publication Title: 

Small mammals within riparian habitats of a regulated and unregulated aridland river

Authors: 
Falck, M.J., K.R. Wilson, and D.C. Andersen
Publication Date: 
2003
Updated Date (text): 
2012-04-26
Parent Publication Title: 
Western North American Naturalist
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2003/0139 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

In northwestern Colorado, flow regulation on the Green River has created a transitional plant community that features encroachment by upland vegetation into cottonwood (Populus fremontii)-dominated, riparian forest on topographically high floodplain sites and reduced cottonwood regeneration on low floodplain sites. To assess how these changes might have affected small mammal distributions, in 1994 and 1995 we live-trapped during periods surrounding spring flooding at 3 sites: above and below the confluence of the regulated Green River and at the ecologically similar, but unregulated, Yampa River (reference site). More species were captured at the most regulated site along the Green River above its confluence with the Yampa River. Within sites, more species were captured in riparian habitats than adjacent upland habitats...

Publication Title: 

Ecology of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and Ord's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ordii) in riparian zones of regulated versus unregulated rivers in northwestern Colorado

Authors: 
Miller, M.S
Publication Date: 
1998
Updated Date (text): 
2009-11-30
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Small mammal population dynamics in riparian zones of regulated versus unregulated rivers in northwestern Colorado

Authors: 
Falck, M
Publication Date: 
1996
Updated Date (text): 
2009-11-20
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

Tamarisk (Salt Cedar) in the Western U.S.: Evaluation of Control/Riparian Restoration Strategies; Wildlife Use of Restored vs. Invaded Habitats; Factors Controlling Distribution and Spread

Code: 
8327BBQ.1.0
Abstract: 

Tamarisk, or salt cedar, is an exotic plant species that has invaded riparian areas throughout the West. Changing physical conditions along western rivers associated with the construction and operation of dams appear in many places to have been more favorable for tamarisk than native riparian competitors such as cottonwoods and willows. The great abundance of tamarisk along western rivers has led resource managers to seek to control it for various reasons, such as the desires to (1) increase the flow of water in streams that might otherwise be lost to evapotranspiration; (2) restore native riparian vegetation; and (3) to improve wildlife habitat. To that end, scientists leading this study will (1) compile data on environmental factors controlling tamarisk distribution and convert the data set into models and tools that managers can use to prioritize sites for control and restoration efforts; (2) conduct greenhouse and field experiments to examine the physiological tolerances of tamarisk and Russian-olive (another riparian invader); (3) apply models (developed along the Lower Colorado River) to the Rio Grande that predict avian use of habitats composed of native vegetation versus those with varying percentages of tamarisk; (4) conduct research on the use of tamarisk habitat by the endangered Southwestern willow flycatcher; and (5) investigate revegetation of xeric riparian habitats following tamarisk control.

River, Reservoir, and Natural Resource Decision Making Using Systems Analysis

Code: 
832798A.7.0
Abstract: 

An overwhelming variety and diversity of scientific disciplines deals with physical parameters, habitat, water flow, chemistry, biology, social elements, and tradeoffs needed for project-planning purposes related to changes in water management and multiple resource impacts. This research project will extract components from existing decision support systems and where needed, develop other model components for inclusion in interactive decision support systems for hydrologic, hydraulic, and instream flow values. This development, analysis, and support of river, reservoir, and natural resource attributes in decision support systems will focus on being more user-friendly and interactive, and will allow for results to be customized by the user (i.e., resource managers).

Trinity/Klamath Systems Impact Assessment Model

Code: 
832798A.6.0
Abstract: 

Several efforts are underway to restore anadromous fish populations in the Trinity-Klamath Basin in California. This study will apply a set of integrated models contained in the Systems Impact Assessment Model (SIAM) to the Basin to review potential water management scenarios or resource allocation alternatives and to provide input to management alternatives, selection and/or implementation.

Green/Yampa River Decision Support System

Code: 
832798A.5.0
Abstract: 

Dams often regulate Western rivers and alter the physical, chemical, and biological elements of the natural ecosystem. These perturbed, regulated river ecosystems have demonstrated impacts on the physical structure of the watershed, river channel, and floodplain; the hydrology and water quality; and the terrestrial, riparian, and aquatic biota. The purpose of this study task is to restore the natural ecological integrity and ecosystem biocomplexity in the Green and Yampa River basins. Ecosystem biocomplexity and ecological integrity research will involve the use of statistical modeling and predictive simulation as tools to construct a scientific basis for sustainability in managed river basins.

Yakima River Water Management Study

Code: 
832798A.25.0
Abstract: 

The Yakima Basin in Washington historically sustained diverse and abundant salmon and steelhead runs. Since 1900, however, anadromous fish runs have declined or have been extirpated. Although numerous out-of-basin mechanisms may be involved in the decline, in-basin changes in the characteristics and dynamics of the riverine habitat have been identified as primary causal agents. Land managers have been assigned the task of improving flow and habitat for the Basin’s remaining anadromous fisheries. This study will develop an integrated water management/habitat response tool that will allow land managers to quantify the feasibility, effectiveness, and risks associated with various water management alternatives.

Estimating Salmon Production Response to Altered Temperature in California Rivers

Code: 
832798A.23.0
Abstract: 

Land managers need to evaluate the effects of a proposed raising of Shasta Dam on downstream salmonid populations in the Sacramento River, California. This study will apply SALMOD, which computes the effects of a time-series of flow and water temperature on growth and survival of Chinook salmon, near Red Bluff using available habitat descriptions and quantifications. The model will use simulated flows and temperatures that reflect potential reservoir operations that would accompany raising Shasta dam, and should enable a more accurate assessment of the effects on salmon.

Upper Delaware River Basin Environmental Flows Study

Code: 
832798A.22.0
Abstract: 

USGS involvement in the Upper Delaware River Basin is the result of Congressional funding directed towards the study of instream habitat needs. The study is supported by the Delaware River Basin Commission, made up of the governors of Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania as well as an appointed federal representative. The goal is to develop ecological flow requirements for the maintenance and restoration of healthy, self sustaining, and managed aquatic ecosystems in the Delaware Basin. This goal must be accomplished in the context of legal requirements for export of water from the rivers and downstream water-delivery requirements for municipal water supplies. Objectives of this study are to (1) quantify habitat metrics over a range of discharges and seasons at selected locations in the mainstem Delaware River and its three tributaries; (2) develop and calibrate a network-wide temperature simulation model for the upper Delaware basin, and (3) develop a prototype decision support system to assist the Commission and other stakeholders in analyzing and interpreting water management and reservoir operation alternatives.

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