predation

Legacy ID: 
4 240
Publication Title: 

Anaxyrus Boreas (Western Toad). Predation

Authors: 
Swartz, L.K, C.R. Faurot-Daniels, B.R. Hossack, and E. Muths
Publication Date: 
2014
Parent Publication Title: 
Herpetological Review
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2014/0092 FORT
Species: 
Topics: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

American Badgers selectively excavate burrows in areas used by blackfooted ferrets: Implications for predator avoidance

Authors: 
Eads, D.A., D.E. Biggins, T.M. Livieri, and J.J. Millspaugh
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2013-09-25
Parent Publication Title: 
Journal of Mammalogy
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0102 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

We evaluated how American badgers (Taxidea taxus) might exert selective pressure on black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) to develop antipredator defenses. In a colony of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) in South Dakota, badgers concentrated their activities where burrow openings and prairie dogs were abundant, a selective behavior that was exhibited by ferrets in the same colony. Badgers excavated burrows more often when in areas recently used by a ferret, suggesting that badgers hunt ferrets or steal prey from ferrets, or both. We also conducted an analysis of survival studies for ferrets and Siberian polecats (M. eversmanii) released onto prairie dog colonies. This polecat is the ferret’s ecological equivalent but evolved without a digging predator. Badgers accounted for 30.0% of predation on polecats and 5.5% of predation on ferrets. In contrast, both polecats and ferrets have evolutionary experience with canids, providing a plausible explanation for the similar relative impact of coyotes (Canis latrans) on them (65.0% and 67.1% of predation, respectively). We hypothesize that ferrets and badgers coexist because ferrets are superior at exploitation competition and are efficient at avoiding badgers, and badgers are superior at interference competition.

(c)Americam Society of Mammalogists

Publication Title: 

Selective predation by feral cats on a native skink on Guam

Authors: 
Lardner, B., R.N. Reed, A.A. Yackel Adams, M.J. Mazurek, T.J. Hinkle, P.M. Levasseur, M.S. Palmer, and J.A. Savidge
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2013-03-21
Parent Publication Title: 
IRCF Reptiles & Amphibians
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0051 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

The big squeeze: pythons and mammals in Everglades National Park [Audio podcast]

Authors: 
Lubeck, M. and R. Reed
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2013-05-03
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0029 FORT
Species: 
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Do predators control prey species abundance? An experimental test with Brown Treesnakes on Guam

Authors: 
Campbell III, E.W., A.A. Yackel Adams, S.J. Converse, T.H. Fritts, and G.H. Rodda
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2013-03-07
Parent Publication Title: 
Ecology
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0047 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

The effect of predators on the abundance of prey species is a topic of ongoing debate in ecology; the effect of snake predators on their prey has been less debated, as there exists a general consensus that snakes do not negatively influence the abundance of their prey. However, this viewpoint has not been adequately tested. We quantified the effect of brown treesnake (Boiga irregularis) predation on the abundance and size of lizards on Guam by contrasting lizards in two 1-ha treatment plots of secondary forest from which snakes had been removed and excluded vs. two 1-ha control plots in which snakes were monitored but not removed or excluded. We removed resident snakes from the treatment plots with snake traps and hand capture, and snake immigration into these plots was precluded by electrified snake barriers. Lizards were sampled in all plots quarterly for a year following snake elimination in the treatment plots. Following the completion of this experiment, we used total removal sampling to census lizards on a 100-m2 subsample of each plot. Results of systematic lizard population monitoring before and after snake removal suggest that the abundance of the skink, Carlia ailanpalai, increased substantially and the abundance of two species of gekkonids, Lepidodactylus lugubris and Hemidactylus frenatus, also increased on snake-free plots. No treatment effect was observed for the skink Emoia caeruleocauda. Mean snout–vent length of all lizard species only increased following snake removal in the treatment plots. The general increase in prey density and mean size was unexpected in light of the literature consensus that snakes do not control the abundance of their prey species. Our findings show that, at least where alternate predators are lacking, snakes may indeed affect prey populations.

Publication Title: 

Boiga irregularis (Brown Treesnake). Predation attempt by crab

Authors: 
Lardner, B., J.A. Savidge, T.J. Hinkle, E. Wostl, S.R. Siers, R.N. Reed, G.H. Rodda
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2011-10-07
Parent Publication Title: 
Herpetological Review
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0119 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

The Coconut Crab (Birgus lacro) , also known as the Robber Crab, is the heaviest terrestrial invertebrate in the world with a mass occasionally exceeding 3 kg (Amesbury 19BO. UL1iv. Guam Tech. Rep. 17:1-39). While primarily an omnivore feeding on vegetative matter and scavenging for dead animals, it may also prey on live invertebrates and vertebrates such as sea turtle hatchlings and rats (Greenaway 2003. Mem. Mus. Victoria 60:13-26; Kessler 2005. Crustaceana 78:761-762)...

Publication Title: 

Boiga irregularis (Brown Treesnake). Predation attempt by praying mantis

Authors: 
Lardner, B., J.A. Savidge, R.N. Reed, G.H Rodda
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2011-10-05
Parent Publication Title: 
Herpetological Review
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0120 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

The Western Pacific island of Guam is known for its introduced population of Boiga irregularis that has had considerable negative effects on vertebrates native to the island (Rodda et a!. 1997. BioScience 47:565-574; Savidge 1987. Ecology 68:660-668). Few animals in Guam are known to prey on the snakes, hut Mangrove Monitors (Varanus indict/s) and feral/domestic cats (Felis catus) may do so (Fritts and Rodda 1998. Annu. Rev. Ecol. Sys. 29:113-140; pers. obs.)…

Publication Title: 

Boiga Irregularis (Brown Treesnake)

Authors: 
Wostl, E., T.J. Hinkle, B. Lardner, and R.N. Reed
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2013-05-03
Parent Publication Title: 
Herpetological Review
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0106 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Introduced Boiga irregularis on the Western Pacific island of Guam feed on a wide variety of vertebrate prey. Stomach contents of juvenile B. irregularis specimens include a large proportion of lizards, especially geckos and skinks (Savidge 1988. J. Herpetol. 22:275–282). Guam is also home to Varanus indicus (Mangrove Monitor), which reach an adult size of ca. 560 mm SVL (Wikramanayake and Dryden 1988. Herpetologica 44:338–344). Varanus indicus are opportunists that feed primarily on arthropods (Dryden 1965. Micronesica 2:72–76), but they may prey on B. irregularis (Fritts and Rodda 1998. Annu. Rev. Ecol. Sys. 29:113–140; McCoid and Witteman 1993. Herpetol. Rev. 24:105). Occasionally the roles are reversed and the snakes prey on monitor eggs (Savidge 1988, op. cit.), but in general, interactions between V. indicus and B. irregularis remain poorly documented…

Publication Title: 

Distribution and postbreeding environmental relationships of Northern Leopard Frogs (Rana Lithobates] Pipiens) in Washington

Authors: 
Germaine, S.S. and D.W. Hays
Publication Date: 
2009
Updated Date (text): 
2011-12-19
Parent Publication Title: 
Western North American Naturalist
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
NONCTR/00272
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Effects of Recreational River Traffic on Nest Defense by Longear Sunfish

Authors: 
Mueller, G
Publication Date: 
1980
Updated Date (text): 
2010-04-22
Parent Publication Title: 
Transactions of the American Fisheries Society
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
NonCTR/00268

Pub Abstract: 

Pages