plague

Publication Title: 

Black-footed ferret conservation: a mix of scientific investigation and operational tasks

Authors: 
Biggins, D.E
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2013-03-07
Parent Publication Title: 
93rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mammalogists, June 14-18, 2013, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0087 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Mitigation efforts to conserve black-footed ferrets during a plague epizootic

Authors: 
Livieri, T.M., D.E. Biggins, R.L. Griebel, and T.E. Rocke
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2013-03-07
Parent Publication Title: 
93rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mammalogists, June 14-18, 2013, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0088 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Information on black-footed ferret biology collected within the framework of ferret conservation

Authors: 
Biggins, D.E
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2012-10-31
Parent Publication Title: 
Western North American Naturalist
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0114 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Once feared to be extinct, black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) were rediscovered near Meeteetse, Wyoming, in 1981, resulting in renewed conservation and research efforts for this highly endangered species. A need for information directly useful to recovery has motivated much monitoring of ferrets since that time, but field activities have enabled collection of data relevant to broader biological themes. This special feature is placed in a context of similar books and proceedings devoted to ferret biology and conservation. Articles include general observations on ferrets, modeling of potential impacts of ferrets on prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), discussions on relationships of ferrets to prairie dog habitats at several spatial scales (from individual burrows to patches of burrow systems) and a general treatise on the status of black-footed ferret recovery.

Publication Title: 

Flea and plague ecology in prairie dog colonies: Ages of colonies, means of colony establishment, and soil characteristics

Authors: 
Eads, D.A., D.E. Biggins, M.F. Antolin, D. Long, and K.L. Gage
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2012-11-26
Parent Publication Title: 
The Wildlife Society 19th Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon, 12-18 October, 2012
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0121 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Plague disrupts ecosystems and creates challenges for wildlife conservation

Authors: 
Biggins, D.E., M.R. Matchett, J. Wimsatt, T.E. Rocke, J.L. Godbey, D.A. Eads, S. Ramakrishnan, and A.R. Goldberg
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2012-11-26
Parent Publication Title: 
The Wildlife Society 19th Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon, 13-18 October 2012
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0122 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Woodrat survival is influenced by plague in the absence of an epizootic: a preliminary study

Authors: 
Wimsatt, J., D.E. Biggins, T.E. Rocke, S. Ramakrishnan
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2012-11-26
Parent Publication Title: 
American Association of Zoo Veterinarians 44th Annual Conference, Oakland, California, October 20 - 26, 2012
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0019 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

A bibliography of literature pertaining to plague (Yersinia pestis)

Authors: 
Ellison, L.E. and M.K. Eberhardt Frank
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2011-11-29
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0130 FORT
Species: 

Pub Abstract: 

Plague is an acute and often fatal zoonotic disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. Y. pestis mainly cycles between small mammals and their fleas; however, it has the potential to infect humans and frequently causes fatalities if left untreated. It is often considered a disease of the past; however, since the late 1800s, plague’s geographic range has expanded greatly, posing new threats in previously unaffected regions of the world, including the Western United States. A literature search was conducted using Internet resources and databases. The keywords chosen for the searches included plague, Yersinia pestis, management, control, wildlife, prairie dogs, fleas, North America, and mammals. Keywords were used alone or in combination with the other terms. Although this search pertains mostly to North America, citations were included from the international research community, as well...

Publication Title: 

A National Park Service Manager's Reference Notebook on Plague (Yersinia pestis)

Authors: 
Castle, K.T., M. Biel, L.E. Ellison, A. Chanlongbutra, M. Chase, D. Licht, M. May, and D.E. Biggins (Compilers)
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2011-04-13
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0029 FORT
Species: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Interface between black-footed ferret research and operational conservation

Authors: 
Biggins, D.E., T.M. Livieri, and S.W. Breck
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2012-12-18
Parent Publication Title: 
Journal of Mammalogy
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0082 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Questions and problems that emerged during operational conservation of black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) have been addressed by a wide variety of studies. Early results from such studies often were communicated orally during meetings of recovery groups and in written form using memoranda, unpublished reports, and theses. Typically, implementation of results preceded their publication in widely distributed journals. Many of these studies eventually were published in journals, and we briefly summarize the contents of 8 volumes and special features of journals that have been dedicated to the biology of ferrets and issues in ferret recovery. This year marks the 30th anniversary of rediscovery of the black-footed ferret, and the 7 papers of the following Special Feature summarize data collected over nearly that span of time.

Publication Title: 

Symposium on the ecology of plague and its effects on wildlife: A model for translational research

Authors: 
Antolin, M.F., D.E. Biggins, and P. Gober
Publication Date: 
2010
Updated Date (text): 
2010-02-17
Parent Publication Title: 
Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2010/0007 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

The notions of plague and plagues—recurring morbidity and mortality with slow recovery after catastrophe—are firmly rooted in virtually all cultures across the globe. Historically, humans have suffered three large-scale plague pandemics caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis: Justinian’s plague in the 6th century that devastated northern Africa and the eastern Mediterranean region, the medieval Black Death that spread westward into Europe in 1347 after emerging in Crimean ports in Asia, and the modern pandemic that stream from China in the late 1800s as it was rapidly transported throughout the globe by modern shipping (Pollitzer 1954)…

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