Error message

  • Deprecated function: Methods with the same name as their class will not be constructors in a future version of PHP; ctools_context has a deprecated constructor in require_once() (line 128 of /afs/usgs.gov/www/www.fort/htdocs/sites/all/modules/ctools/ctools.module).
  • Deprecated function: Methods with the same name as their class will not be constructors in a future version of PHP; ctools_context_required has a deprecated constructor in require_once() (line 128 of /afs/usgs.gov/www/www.fort/htdocs/sites/all/modules/ctools/ctools.module).
  • Deprecated function: Methods with the same name as their class will not be constructors in a future version of PHP; ctools_context_optional has a deprecated constructor in require_once() (line 128 of /afs/usgs.gov/www/www.fort/htdocs/sites/all/modules/ctools/ctools.module).

habitat suitability

Legacy ID: 
2 413
Publication Title: 

The Hyper-Envelope Modeling Interface (HEMI): a novel approach illustrated through predicting Tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) habitat in the Western USA

Authors: 
Graham, J., N. Young, C.S. Jarnevich, G. Newman, P. Evangelista, and T.J. Stohlgren
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2011-06-29
Parent Publication Title: 
Environmental Management
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0089 FORT
Species: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Regional distribution models with lack of proximate predictors: Africanized honeybees expanding north

Authors: 
Jarnevich, C.S., W.E. Esaias, P.L.A. Ma, J.T. Morisette, J.E. Nickeson, T.J. Stohlgren, T.R. Holcombe, J.M. Nightingale, R.E. Wolfe, and B. Tan
Publication Date: 
2014
Updated Date (text): 
2011-03-25
Parent Publication Title: 
Diversity and Distributions
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2014/0005 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Aim Species distribution models have often been hampered by poor local species data, reliance on coarse-scale climate predictors and the assumption that species–environment relationships, even with non-proximate predictors, are consistent across geographical space. Yet locally accurate maps of invasive species, such as the Africanized honeybee (AHB) in North America, are needed to support conservation efforts. Current AHB range maps are relatively coarse and are inconsistent with observed data. Our aim was to improve distribution maps using more proximate predictors (phenology) and using regional models rather than one across the entire range of interest to explore potential differences in drivers.

Location United States of America.

Methods We provide a generalized framework for regional and local species distribution modelling with our more nuanced and spatially detailed forecast of potential AHB spread using multiple habitat modelling techniques and newly derived remotely sensed phenology layers.

Results Variable importance did differ between the two regions for which we modelled AHB. Phenology metrics were important, especially in the south-east.

Main conclusions Results demonstrate that incorporating a combination of both climate drivers and vegetation phenology information into models can be important for predicting the suitable habitat range of these pollinators. Regional models may provide evidence of differing drivers of distributions geographically. This framework may improve many local and regional species distribution modelling efforts.

Publication Title: 

Bighorn sheep habitat suitability on the Mesa Verde cuesta

Authors: 
Zeigenfuss, L.C
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2011-03-11
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0014 FORT
Species: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Balancing energy development and conservation: A method utilizing species distribution models

Authors: 
Jarnevich, C.S. and M.K. Laubhan
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2011-05-10
Parent Publication Title: 
Environmental Management
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0036 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Balancing energy development and conservation: a method utilizing species distribution models

Authors: 
Jarnevich, C.S. and M.K. Laubhan
Publication Date: 
2010
Updated Date (text): 
2013-05-03
Parent Publication Title: 
95th Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting August 1-6, 2010, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2010/0140 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Giant constrictor risk assessment: Frequently asked questions

Authors: 
Puckett, C., R. Reed, G. Rodda, and J. Wilson
Publication Date: 
2009
Updated Date (text): 
2012-12-03
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2009/0099 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Q: Why did you do the study that resulted in this report?

USGS research participation was requested by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Park Service because those agencies were faced with a number of complex questions about how they should respond to the presence of giant constrictors in the U.S. and the prospect of additional giant constrictor species in the wild. These agencies particularly wanted USGS to address risks to wildlife, ecosystems, and human safety...

Publication Title: 

Report Documents the Risks of Giant Invasive Snakes in the U.S

Authors: 
Puckett, C., G. Rodda, and R. Reed
Publication Date: 
2009
Updated Date (text): 
2009-10-16
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2009/0100 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Five giant non-native snake species would pose high risks to the health of ecosystems in the United States should they become established here, according to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) report released today.

The USGS report details the risks of nine non-native boa, anaconda and python species that are invasive or potentially invasive in the United States. Because all nine species share characteristics associated with greater risks, none was found to be a low ecological risk. Two of these species are documented as reproducing in the wild in South Florida, with population estimates for Burmese pythons in the tens of thousands...

Publication Title: 

Giant constrictor snakes in Florida: A sizeable research challenge

Authors: 
Wilson, J., R. Reed, and G. Rodda
Publication Date: 
2009
Updated Date (text): 
2012-02-14
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2009/0098 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

Since the mid-1990s, several species of non-native, giant constrictor snakes, such as Burmese pythons and boa constrictors, have surfaced in localities throughout southern Florida. Several are known or suspected to be breeding and appear to be spreading northward. Increasingly, media and other reports of sightings or encounters with these animals have emphasized the dangers they could impose on native species, ecosystems, pets, and people. The USGS Fort Collins Science Center (FORT), government resource management agencies, the University of Florida, Davidson College (NC), and The Nature Conservancy have been collaborating on research and intervention methods to cope with an urgent need to understand and control these large, widespread predators.
FORT scientists are intimately familiar with snake invasion research and prevention. For more than 20 years, they have been involved with the invasive brown treesnake (Boiga irregularis) on the island of Guam...

Publication Title: 

Field evaluation of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model near boulders for habitat calculation

Authors: 
Waddle, T
Publication Date: 
2010
Updated Date (text): 
2010-07-07
Parent Publication Title: 
River Research and Applications
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2010/0057 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Two-dimensional hydrodynamic models are now widely used in aquatic habitat studies. To test the sensitivity of calculated habitat outcomes to limitations of such a model and of typical field data, bathymetry, depth and velocity data were collected for three discharges in the vicinity of two large boulders in the South Platte River (Colorado) and used in the River2D model. Simulated depth and velocity were compared with observed values at 204 locations and the differences in habitat numbers produced by observed and simulated conditions were calculated. The bulk of the differences between simulated and observed depth and velocity values were found to lie within the likely error of measurement...

Publication Title: 

Simulation of flow and habitat conditions under ice, Cache la Poudre River — January 2006

Authors: 
Waddle, T
Publication Date: 
2007
Updated Date (text): 
2009-07-06
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2007/0056 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

The U.S. Forest Service authorizes the occupancy and use of Forest Service lands by various projects, including water storage facilities, under the Federal Land Policy and Management Act. Federal Land Policy and Management Act permits can be renewed at the end of their term. The U.S. Forest Service analyzes the environmental effects for the initial issuance or renewal of a permit and the terms and conditions (for example, mitigations plans) contained in the permit for the facilities. The U.S. Forest Service is preparing an environmental impact statement (EIS) to determine the conditions for the occupancy and use for Long Draw Reservoir on National Forest System administered lands. The scope of the EIS includes evaluating current operations and effects to fish habitat of an ongoing winter release of 0.283 m3/s (10 ft3/s) from headwater reservoirs as part of a previously issued permit. The field conditions observed during this study included this release.

The U.S. Forest Service entered into an interagency agreement (05-IA-11021000-030) with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center to perform analysis of fish habitat and flow relationships in the Cache la Poudre River during winter ice-over conditions using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The U.S. Forest Service selected the Fort Collins Science Center for this task because of their expertise in developing two-dimensional hydraulic models for habitat modeling applications. This report transmits model results to the U.S. Forest Service to analyze the effects of alternative flow scenarios at a site on the mainstem Cache la Poudre River in Larimer County, Colorado, near Kinikinik (40� 42' 44.16" N. lat, 105� 44' 30.70" W. log), as shown in figure 1. It will be used in pending environmental analyses and decisions for the occupancy and use of the Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forest by water storage facilities.

The water management scenarios of interest in this study are related to releasing water from Chambers and Barnes Meadows Reservoirs, based on the assumption that winter flow augmentation can increase potential fish habitat. Figure 2 shows the relationship between Chambers, Barnes Meadows, and Long Draw Reservoirs. At the time this study was proposed, existing flow simulation results showed that the channel constraints imposed by existing artificial low-head dikes would have little or no effect on the hydrodynamics of the river at the low flow levels that were to be evaluated. The Kinikinik study site contains deep pools, riffles, and runs. This diversity of habitat types made it ideal for assessing the effects of altered flow on fish habitat under ice in the main stem Cache la Poudre River. Thus, the Kinikinik site was selected for this study of winter habitat conditions.

The preexisting topographic and hydrologic data collected at this site enabled data collection efforts for this study to focus on describing streamflow and ice cover during the winter months. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model, River2D (Steffler and Blackburn, 2002), was used to simulate flow conditions under the ice cover that was observed January 24, 2006.

The objectives of this study are (1) to describe the extent and thickness of ice cover, (2) simulate depth and velocity under ice at the study site for observed and reduced flows, and (3) to quantify fish habitat in this portion of the mainstem Cache la Poudre River for the current winter release schedule as well as for similar conditions without the 0.283 m3/s winter release.

Pages