Geographic Information Systems

Legacy ID: 
2 188
Publication Title: 

High throughput computing: A solution for scientific analysis

Authors: 
O'Donnell, M
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2011-10-04
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0100 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Public land management agencies continually face resource management problems that are exacerbated by climate warming, land-use change, and other human activities. As the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) works with managers in U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) agencies and other federal, state, and private entities, researchers are finding that the science needed to address these complex ecological questions across time and space produces substantial amounts of data...

Publication Title: 

A scalable geospatial support network model

Authors: 
O’Donnell, M.S. and T.J. Assal
Publication Date: 
2009
Updated Date (text): 
2013-03-28
Parent Publication Title: 
ESRI International User Conference, July 8-12, 2009, San Diego, CA
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2009/0156 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Land management and scientific projects alike require geospatial insights of the interactions between biotic and abiotic processes to improve decision-support systems; adhere to federal, state, and local regulations, and minimize litigation. The geospatial support network model is a framework of components relevant to managers seeking an infrastructure for integrating and designing a geographic project component, understanding feedback loops and connectivity between these components, and assessing the associated capital inputs. The infrastructure presented within the model provides (1) a scalable framework that allow adoption and modification of feature connectivity relevant to user needs (2) and the processes for integrating multi-faceted projects that rely on spatial information at varying hierarchies.

Publication Title: 

Invasive species management and research using GIS

Authors: 
Holcombe, T., T.J. Stohlgren, and C. Jarnevich
Publication Date: 
2007
Updated Date (text): 
2010-01-20
Parent Publication Title: 
Managing vertebrate invasive species: Proceedings of an international symposium
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2007/0110 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Geographical Information Systems (GIS) are powerful tools in the field of invasive species management. GIS can be used to create potential distribution maps for all manner of taxa, including plants, animals, and diseases. GIS also performs well in the early detection and rapid assessment of invasive species. Here, we used GIS applications to investigate species richness and invasion patterns in fish in the United States (US) at the 6-digit Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC) level. We also created maps of potential spread of the cane toad (Bufo marinus) in the southeastern US at the 8-digit HUC level using regression and environmental envelope techniques…

Publication Title: 

A global organism detection and monitoring system for non-native species

Authors: 
Graham, J., G. Newman, C. Jarnevich, R. Shory, and T.J. Stohlgren
Publication Date: 
2007
Updated Date (text): 
2009-01-09
Parent Publication Title: 
Ecological Informatics
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2007/0069 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Economic development and conservation of biological and cultural diversity in Yunnan Province, China

Authors: 
Stendell, R.C., R.L. Johnson, J.P. Mosesso, and X. Zhang
Publication Date: 
2001
Updated Date (text): 
2009-06-16
Parent Publication Title: 
Environmental Development and Sustainability
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2001/0019 MESC-pdf

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Evaluation of Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) for measuring river corridor topography

Authors: 
Bowen, Z.H., and R.G. Waltermire
Publication Date: 
2002
Updated Date (text): 
2005-01-18
Parent Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Water Resources Association
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2002/0006 FORT - pdf

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Integrating geographic information systems for water resources research (stage I) in the National Parks

Authors: 
Paulson, M.J. and R. Herrmann
Publication Date: 
1993
Updated Date (text): 
2010-12-13
Parent Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the Symposium on Geographic Information Systems and Water Resources. Mobile, Alabama. March 14-17, 1993
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
1993/0114 NERC

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Landscape analysis of plant diversity

Authors: 
Stohlgren, T.J., M.B. Coughenour, G.W. Chong, D. Binkley, M.A. Kalkhan, L.D. Schell, D.J. Buckley, and J.K. Berry
Publication Date: 
1997
Updated Date (text): 
2003-06-03
Parent Publication Title: 
Landscape Ecology
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
1997/0057 MESC pdf

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Proceedings of a workshop on data bases and geographic information systems for refuges in Region 1, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Authors: 
Hamilton, D.B., and J.E. Roelle
Publication Date: 
1994
Updated Date (text): 
2004-04-15
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
1994/0040 MESC

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Surface Cover Changes in the Rio Grande Floodplain, 1935-89

Authors: 
Roelle, J.E., and W.W. Hagenbuck
Publication Date: 
1995
Parent Publication Title: 
Our Living Resources: A report to the nation on the distribution, abundance, and health of U.S. plants, animals, and ecosystems
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
1995/0080 MESC

Pub Abstract: 

Riparian (streamside) vegetation communities provide valuable habitat for wildlife, particularly in the arid and semi-arid Southwest, where such communities make up less than 1% of the landscape (Knopf et al. 1988). Agricultural conversion, urban and suburban expansion, water development, recreation, and invasion by non-native species such as Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) and saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) have severely reduced the extent and quality of these habitats. Despite such impacts, the floodplain of the Rio Grande in central New Mexico supports one of the most extensive cottonwood (Populus fremontii) gallery forests (bosque) remaining in the Southwest (Howe and Knopf 1991), and interest in ensuring the long-term health and viability of native communities along the Rio Grande has been steadily increasing (Crawford et al. 1993). This article documents changes between 1935 and 1989 in cover types of the floodplain of the Rio Grande in central New Mexico.

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