exotic species

Legacy ID: 
1 779
Publication Title: 

White-Nose Syndrome Fungus (Geomyces destructans) in bats, Europe

Authors: 
Wibbelt, G., A. Kruth, D. Hellmann, W. Weishaar, A. Barlow, M. Veith, J. Pruger, T. Gorfol, L. Grosche, F. Bontadina, U. Zophel, H.P. Seidl, P.M. Cryan, and D.S. Biehert
Publication Date: 
2010
Updated Date (text): 
2010-11-23
Parent Publication Title: 
Emerging Infectious Diseases
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2010/0072 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

White-nose syndrome is an emerging disease in North America that has caused substantial declines in hibernating bats. A recently identifi ed fungus (Geomyces destructans) causes skin lesions that are characteristic of this disease. Typical signs of this infection were not observed in bats in North America before white-nose syndrome was detected. However, unconfirmed reports from Europe indicated white fungal growth on hibernating bats without associated
deaths. To investigate these differences, hibernating bats were sampled in Germany, Switzerland, and Hungary to determine whether G. destructans is present in Europe. Microscopic observations, fungal culture, and genetic analyses of 43 samples from 23 bats indicated that 21 bats of 5 species in 3 countries were colonized by G. destructans. We hypothesize that G. destructans is present throughout Europe and that bats in Europe may be more immunologically or behaviorally resistant to G. destructans than their congeners in North America because they potentially coevolved with the fungus.

Publication Title: 

Ecological forecasting: A strategic partnership to predict and manage biological invasions

Authors: 
Stohlgren, T., J. Schnase, J. Smith, and J. Wilson
Publication Date: 
2005
Updated Date (text): 
2010-01-07
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2005/0166 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

During the past century, thousands of non-native plants, animals, and pathogens have been introduced into all ecosystems in the United States. A growing number of these species have become "invasive," spreading at such a rapid rate that they have contributed to declines in native species and changes in ecosystem function. Invasive species incur substantial ecological, economic, and human health costs. In the U.S., this translates to an estimated $137 billion per year2, more than all other natural disasters combined. Increased human travel and trade, coupled with the changing types and patterns of environmental disturbance such as climate change and wildfire, are expected to exacerbate these impacts. Land and resource managers face the enormous challenge of identifying and locating invasive species in and around their jurisdictions, controlling what is already present, and preventing further proliferation or new invasions. The need has never been greater for an ecological forecasting capability that will address these urgent management needs and forestall what is in danger of becoming a disastrous trend.

Publication Title: 

The role of spatial autocorrelation in native-exotic plant species richness relationships

Authors: 
Kumar, S., and T.J. Stohlgren
Updated Date (text): 
2007-08-21
Parent Publication Title: 
Ecology Letters
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Essential attributes of plant diversity and invasion studies

Authors: 
Stohlgren, T.S., S. Kumar, C.S. Jarnevich, and M.A. Kelkhen
Publication Date: 
2007
Updated Date (text): 
2008-09-09
Parent Publication Title: 
ESA/SER Joint Meeting: Sunday, August 5 – Friday, August 10, 2007; San Jose McEnery Convention Center – San Jose, California
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2007/0116 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Rapid assessment of postfire plant invasions in coniferous forests of the western United States

Authors: 
Freeman, J.P., T.J. Stohlgren, M.E. Hunter, P.N. Omi, E.J. Martinson, G.W. Chong, and C.S. Brown
Publication Date: 
2007
Updated Date (text): 
2009-01-09
Parent Publication Title: 
Ecological Applications
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2007/0058 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Balancing data sharing requirements for analyses with data sensitivity

Authors: 
Jarnevich, C.S., J.J. Graham, G.J. Newman, A.W. Crall, and T.J. Stohlgren
Publication Date: 
2007
Updated Date (text): 
2008-10-22
Parent Publication Title: 
Biological Invasions
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2007/0032 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

The invasion paradox: Reconciling pattern and process in species invasions

Authors: 
Fridley, J.D., J.J. Stachowicz, S. Naeem, D.F. Sax, E.W. Seabloom, M.D. Smith, T.J. Stohlgren, D. Tilman, and B. Von Holle
Publication Date: 
2007
Updated Date (text): 
2009-07-01
Parent Publication Title: 
Ecology
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2007/0136 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Abundance of woody riparian species in the western USA in relation to phenology, climate, and flow regime

Authors: 
Auble, G.T., J.M. Friedman, M.L. Scott, P.B. Shafroth, M.F. Merigliano, M.D. Freehling, R.E. Evans, and E.R. Griffin
Publication Date: 
2004
Updated Date (text): 
2009-08-11
Parent Publication Title: 
EOS Transactions, AGU Fall Meeting Supplement, December 13-17, 2004, San Francisco, CA
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2004/0055 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Evaluating plant invasions from both habitat and species perspectives

Authors: 
Chong, G.W., Y. Otsuki, T.J. Stohlgren, D. Guenther, P. Evangelista, C. Villa, and A. Waters
Publication Date: 
2006
Updated Date (text): 
2008-11-03
Parent Publication Title: 
Western North American Naturalist
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2006/0173 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Control of Tamarix in the western United States: implications for water salvage, wildlife use, and riparian restoration

Authors: 
Shafroth, P.B., J.R. Cleverly, T.L. Dudley, J.P. Taylor, C. van Riper III, E.P. Weeks, and J.N. Stuart
Publication Date: 
2005
Updated Date (text): 
2008-07-23
Parent Publication Title: 
Environmental Management
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2005/0091 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

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