cottonwood

Legacy ID: 
1 167
Publication Title: 

Alternative standardization approaches to improving streamflow reconstructions with ring-width indices of riparian trees

Authors: 
Meko, D.M., J.M. Friedman, R. Touchan, J.R. Edmondson, E.R. Griffin, and J.A. Scott
Publication Date: 
2015
Parent Publication Title: 
The Holocene
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2015/0040 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

Old, multi-aged populations of riparian trees provide an opportunity to improve reconstructions of streamflow. Here, ring widths of 394 plains cottonwood (Populus deltoids, ssp. monilifera) trees in the North Unit of Theodore Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota, are used to reconstruct streamflow along the Little Missouri River (LMR), North Dakota, US. Different versions of the cottonwood chronology are developed by (1) age-curve standardization (ACS), using age-stratified samples and a single estimated curve of ring width against estimated ring age, and (2) time-curve standardization (TCS), using a subset of longer ring-width series individually detrended with cubic smoothing splines of width against year. The cottonwood chronologies are combined with the first principal component of four upland conifer chronologies developed by conventional methods to investigate the possible value of riparian tree-ring chronologies for streamflow reconstruction of the LMR. Regression modeling indicates that the statistical signal for flow is stronger in the riparian cottonwood than in the upland chronologies. The flow signal from cottonwood complements rather than repeats the signal from upland conifers and is especially strong in young trees (e.g. 5–35 years). Reconstructions using a combination of cottonwoods and upland conifers are found to explain more than 50% of the variance of LMR flow over a 1935–1990 calibration period and to yield reconstruction of flow to 1658. The low-frequency component of reconstructed flow is sensitive to the choice of standardization method for the cottonwood. In contrast to the TCS version, the ACS reconstruction features persistent low flows in the 19th century. Results demonstrate the value to streamflow reconstruction of riparian cottonwood and suggest that more studies are needed to exploit the low-frequency streamflow signal in densely sampled age-stratified stands of riparian trees.

Publication Title: 

Cottonwood tree rings and climate in western North America

Authors: 
Friedman, J.M., J.R. Edmondson, E.R. Griffin, D.M. Meko, M.F. Merigliano, J.A. Scott, M.L. Scott, and R. Touchan
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2013-01-22
Parent Publication Title: 
45th Annual Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, San Francisco, CA, December 3-7, 2012
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0140 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Projecting climate change effects on cottonwood and willow seed dispersal phenology, flood timing, and seedling recruitment in western riparian forests

Authors: 
Perry, L.G
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2012-10-05
Parent Publication Title: 
NCCWSC website
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0043 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Forty years of vegetation change on the Missouri River floodplain

Authors: 
Johnson, W.C., M.D. Dixon, M.L. Scott, L. Rabbe, G. Larson, M. Volke, and B. Werner
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2013-05-03
Parent Publication Title: 
BioScience
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0028 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Comparative inventories in 1969 and 1970 and in 2008 of vegetation from 30 forest stands downstream of Garrison Dam on the Missouri River in central North Dakota showed (a) a sharp decline in Cottonwood regeneration; (b) a strong compositional shift toward dominance by green ash; and (c) large increases in invasive understory species, such as smooth brome, reed canary grass, and Canada thistle. These changes, and others discovered during remeasurement, have been caused by a complex of factors, some related to damming (altered hydrologic and sediment regimes, delta formation, and associated wet—dry cycles) and some not (diseases and expansion of invasive plants). Dominance of green ash, however, may be short lived, given the likelihood that the emerald ash borer will arrive in the Dakotas in 5–10 years, with potentially devastating effects. The prospects for recovery of this valuable ecosystem, rich in ecosystem goods and services and in American history, are daunting.

Publication Title: 

Deciphering the seasonal climate signal in tree rings

Authors: 
Meko, D., R. Touchan, J. Friedman, J. Edmondson, J. Scott, and E. Griffin
Updated Date (text): 
2012-04-25
Parent Publication Title: 
Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting, Feb. 24-28, 2012, New York, NY
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0027 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Edaphic, salinity, and stand structural trends in chronosequences of native and non-native dominated riparian forests along the Colorado River, USA

Authors: 
Merritt, D.M. and P.B. Shafroth
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2012-10-31
Parent Publication Title: 
Biological Invasions
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0115 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Tamarix spp. are introduced shrubs that have become among the most abundant woody plants growing along western North American rivers. We sought to empirically test the long-held belief that Tamarix actively displaces native species through elevating soil salinity via salt exudation. We measured chemical and physical attributes of soils (e.g., salinity, major cations and anions, texture), litter cover and depth, and stand structure along chronosequences dominated by Tamarix and those dominated by native riparian species (Populus or Salix) along the upper and lower Colorado River in Colorado and Arizona/California, USA. We tested four hypotheses:

  1. The rate of salt accumulation in soils is faster in Tamarix dominated stands than stands dominated by native species,
  2. The concentration of salts in the soil is higher in mature stands dominated by Tamarix compared to native stands,
  3. Soil salinity is a function of Tamarix abundance, and
  4. Available nutrients are more concentrated in native-dominated stands compared to Tamarix-dominated stands.

We found that salt concentration increases at a faster rate in Tamarix-dominated stands along the relatively freeflowing upper Colorado but not along the heavily regulated lower Colorado. Concentrations of ions that are known to be preferentially exuded by Tamarix (e.g., B, Na, and Cl) were higher in Tamarix stands than in native stands. Soil salt concentrations in older Tamarix stands along the upper Colorado were sufficiently high to inhibit germination, establishment, or growth of some native species. On the lower Colorado, salinity was very high in all stands and is likely due to factors associated with floodplain development and the hydrologic effects of river regulation, such as reduced overbank flooding, evaporation of shallow ground water, higher salt concentrations in surface and ground water due to agricultural practices, and higher salt concentrations in fine-textured sediments derived from naturally saline parent material.

Publication Title: 

Tree-Ring Records of Variation in Flow and Channel Geometry

Authors: 
Merigliano, M.F., J.M. Friedman and M.L. Scott
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2010-09-14
Parent Publication Title: 
Treastie on Geomorphology
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0031 FORT
Species: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Channel Incision and Riparian Cottonwoods: Mojave River, CA

Authors: 
Scott, M., G. Lines, and G. Auble
Publication Date: 
2000
Updated Date (text): 
2012-05-18
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

 In 1995, mapping and classification of riparian vegetation along the Mojave River in southern California revealed an 8-km reach in which riparian cottonwoods (Populus fremontii Wats.) were stressed or dying. We tested a set of predictions based on the inference that cottonwood decline was an indirect result of lowered water-table levels following flood-related channel incision. Comparisons of topographic cross-sections from 1963 and 1997, indicated a net change in channel elevation between −0·71 and −3·6 m within zones of cottonwood stress and mortality. Ages of young cottonwood and willow stems adjacent to the present channel and radial stem growth of surviving cottonwoods were consistent with the inference that channel incision, associated with sustained flooding in January and February of 1993, lowered channel elevations throughout the affected reach. Well records and soil redoximorphic features indicate that channel incision caused net water-table declines over 1·5 m on portions of the adjacent flood plain where cottonwood stand mortality ranged between 58 and 93%. In areas where water-table declines were estimated to be <1·0 m, stand mortality was 7–13%.

Publication Title: 

Genetic and environmental influences on cold hardiness of native and introduced riparian trees

Authors: 
Friedman, J.S., J.E. Roelle, and B.S. Cade
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2013-04-24
Parent Publication Title: 
National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations – 2011
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0127 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

To explore latitudinal genetic variation in cold hardiness and leaf phenology, we planted a common garden of paired collections of native and introduced riparian trees sampled along a latitudinal gradient. The garden in Fort Collins, Colorado (latitude 40.6°N), included 681 native plains cottonwood (Populus deltoids subsp. monilifera) and introduced saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima, T. chinensis, and hybrids) collected from 15 sites from 29.2 to 47.6°N in the central United States. In the common garden, both species showed latitudinal variation in fall, but not spring, leaf phenology. This suggests that latitudinal gradient field observations in fall phenology are a result, at least in part, of the inherited variation in the critical photoperiod. Conversely, the latitudinal gradient field observations in spring phenology are largely a plastic response to the temperature gradient. Populations from higher latitudes exhibited earlier bud set and leaf senescence. Cold hardiness varied latitudinally in both fall and spring for both species. Although cottonwood was hardier than saltcedar in midwinter, the reverse was true in late fall and early spring. The latitudinal variation in fall phenology and cold hardiness of saltcedar appears to have developed as a result of multiple introductions of genetically distinct populations, hybridization, and natural selection in the 150 years since introduction.

Publication Title: 

Novel plant communities limit the effects of a managed flood to restore riparian forests along a large regulated river

Authors: 
Cooper, D.J. and D.C. Andersen
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2012-01-27
Parent Publication Title: 
River Research and Applications
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0004 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Dam releases used to create downstream flows that mimic historic floods in timing, peak magnitude and recession rate are touted as key tools for restoring riparian vegetation on large regulated rivers. We analysed a flood on the 5th-order Green River below Flaming Gorge Dam, Colorado, in a broad alluvial valley where Fremont cottonwood riparian forests have senesced and little recruitment has occurred since dam completion in 1962. The stable post dam flow regime triggered the development of novel riparian communities with dense herbaceous plant cover. We monitored cottonwood recruitment on landforms inundated by a managed flood equal in magnitude and timing to the average pre-dam flood...

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