Bureau of Land Management

Legacy ID: 
391
Publication Title: 

​Potential demographic and genetic effects of a sterilant applied to wild horse mares

Authors: 
Roelle, J.E., S.J. Oyler-McCance
Publication Date: 
2015
Parent Publication Title: 
U.S. Geological Survey
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2015/0025 FORT
Species: 
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

Wild horse populations on western ranges can increase rapidly, resulting in the need for the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to remove animals in order to protect the habitat that horses share with numerous other species. As an alternative to removals, BLM has sought to develop a long-term, perhaps even permanent, contraceptive to aid in reducing population growth rates. With long-term (perhaps even permanent) efficacy of contraception, however, comes increased concern about the genetic health of populations and about the potential for local extirpation. We used simulation modeling to examine the potential demographic and genetic consequences of applying a mare sterilant to wild horse populations. Using the VORTEX software package, we modeled the potential effects of a sterilant on 70 simulated populations having different initial sizes (7 values), growth rates (5 values), and genetic diversity (2 values). For each population, we varied the treatment rate of mares from 0 to 100 percent in increments of 10 percent. For each combination of these treatment levels, we ran 100 stochastic simulations, and we present the results in the form of tables and graphs showing mean population size after 20 years, mean number of removals after 20 years, mean probability of extirpation after 50 years, and mean heterozygosity after 50 years. By choosing one or two combinations of initial population size, population growth rate, and genetic diversity that best represent a herd of interest, a manager can assess the likely effects of a contraceptive program by examining the output tables and graphs representing the selected conditions.

Publication Title: 

The Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment---Final Report

Authors: 
Carr, N.B., C.P. Melcher, K.R. Sherrill, A.W. Walters, A. Ray, S.L. Garman, J.R. Hickey, Z.H. Bowen, L.T. George, J. Wesner, M. O'Donnell, R. Means, J. Littell, L.E. Burris, C.S. Jarnevich, B. Liebmann, D. Allured, K.L. Zellman, C.Cleaver, W.R. Jacoby, N.M. Brunner, J.J. Roberts, G. Reese, M. Holloran, S. Germaine
Parent Publication Title: 
U.S. Geological Survey
Archive number: 
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

 

Publication Title: 

Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment

Authors: 
Carr, N.B and R.E. Means
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2013-12-03
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0061 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

The overall goal of the Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment (REA) is to provide information that supports regional planning and analysis for the management of ecological resources. The REA provides an assessment of baseline ecological conditions, an evaluation of current risks from drivers of ecosystem change (including energy development, fire, and invasive species), and a predictive capacity for evaluating future risks (including climate change). Additionally, the REA may be used for identifying priority areas for conservation or restoration and for assessing cumulative effects of multiple land uses. The Wyoming Basin REA will address Management Questions developed by the Bureau of Land Management and other agency partners for 8 major biomes and 19 species or species assemblages. The maps developed for addressing Management Questions will be integrated into overall maps of landscape-level ecological values and risks. The maps can be used to address the goals of the REA at a number of levels: for individual species, species assemblages, aquatic and terrestrial systems, and for the entire ecoregion. This allows flexibility in how the products of the REA are compiled to inform planning and management actions across a broad range of spatial scales.

Publication Title: 

Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment: Work Plan

Authors: 
Carr, N.B., S.L. Garman, A. Walters, A. Ray, C.P. Melcher, J.S. Wesner, M.S. O’Donnell, K.R. Sherrill, N.C. Babel, and Z.H. Bowen
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2013-05-29
Parent Publication Title: 
U.S. Geological Survey
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0103 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

The overall goal of the Rapid Ecoregional Assessments (REAs) being conducted for the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is to provide information that supports regional planning and analysis for the management of ecological resources. The REA provides an assessment of baseline ecological conditions, an evaluation of current risks from drivers of ecosystem change, and a predictive capacity for evaluating future risks. The REA also may be used for identifying priority areas for conservation or restoration and for assessing the cumulative effects of a variety of land uses. There are several components of the REAs. Management Questions, developed by the BLM and partners for the ecoregion, identify the information needed for addressing land-management responsibilities. Conservation Elements represent regionally significant aquatic and terrestrial species and communities that are to be conserved and (or) restored. The REA also will evaluate major drivers of ecosystem change (Change Agents) currently affecting or likely to affect the status of Conservation Elements. We selected 8 major biomes and 19 species or species assemblages to be included as Conservation Elements. We will address the four primary Change Agents—development, fire, invasive species, and climate change—required for the REA. The purpose of the work plan for the Wyoming Basin REA is to document the selection process for, and final list of, Management Questions, Conservation Elements, and Change Agents. The work plan also presents the overall assessment framework that will be used to assess the status of Conservation Elements and answer Management Questions.

Publication Title: 

Black-footed ferret conservation: a mix of scientific investigation and operational tasks

Authors: 
Biggins, D.E
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2013-03-07
Parent Publication Title: 
93rd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mammalogists, June 14-18, 2013, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0087 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Summary of science, activities, programs and policies that influence the rangewide conservation of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocerus urophasianus)

Authors: 
Manier, D.J., D.J.A. Wood, Z.H. Bowen, R.M. Donovan, M.J. Holloran, L.M. Juliusson, K.S. Mayne,, S.J. Oyler-McCance, F.R. Quamen, D.J. Saher, and A.J. Titolo
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2013-03-06
Parent Publication Title: 
U.S. Geological Survey
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0033 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

The Greater Sage-Grouse, has been observed, hunted, and counted for decades. The sagebrush biome, home to the Greater Sage-Grouse, includes sagebrush-steppe and Great Basin sagebrush communities, interspersed with grasslands, salt flats, badlands, mountain ranges, springs, intermittent creeks and washes, and major river systems, and is one of the most widespread and enigmatic components of Western U.S. landscapes. Over time, habitat conversion, degradation, and fragmentation have accumulated across the entire range such that local conditions as well as habitat distributions at local and regional scales are negatively affecting the long-term persistence of this species. Historic patterns of human use and settlement of the sagebrush ecosystem have contributed to the current condition and status of sage-grouse populations. The accumulation of habitat loss, persistent habitat degradation, and fragmentation by industry and urban infrastructure, as indicated by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) findings, presents a significant challenge for conservation of this species and sustainable management of the sagebrush ecosystem. Because of the wide variations in natural and human history across these landscapes, no single prescription for management of sagebrush ecosystems (including sage-grouse habitats) will suffice to guide the collective efforts of public and private entities to conserve the species and its habitat.

This report documents and summarizes several decades of work on sage-grouse populations, sagebrush as habitat, and sagebrush community and ecosystem functions based on the recent assessment and findings of the USFWS under consideration of the Endangered Species Act. As reflected here, some of these topics receive a greater depth of discussion because of the perceived importance of the issue for sagebrush ecosystems and sage-grouse populations. Drawing connections between the direct effects on sagebrush ecosystems and the effect of ecosystem condition on habitat condition, and finally the connection between habitat quality and sage-grouse population dynamics remains an important goal for science, management, and conservation. This effort is necessary, despite the perception that these complicated, indirect relations are difficult to characterize and manage, and the many advances in understanding and application developed toward this end have been documented here to help inform regional planning and policy decisions.

Publication Title: 

Locations and attributes of wind turbines in New Mexico, 2011

Authors: 
Carr, N.B., J.E. Diffendorfer, T. Fancher, S.J. Hawkins, N. Latysh, K.J. Leib, and A.M. Matherne
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2012-10-24
Parent Publication Title: 
U.S. Geological Survey
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0056 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

This dataset represents an update to U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 596. Locations and attributes of wind turbines in New Mexico, 2009 (available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/596/).This updated New Mexico wind turbine Data Series provides geospatial data for all 562 wind turbines established within the State of New Mexico as of June 2011, an increase of 155 wind turbines from 2009.

Attributes specific to each turbine include: turbine location, manufacturer and model, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, potential megawatt output, land ownership, county, and development status of wind turbine. Wind energy facility data for each turbine include: facility name, facility power capacity, number of turbines associated with each facility to date, facility developer, facility ownership, and year the facility went online. The locations of turbines are derived from 1-meter true-color aerial photographs produced by the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP); the photographs have a positional accuracy of about ±5 meters. The locations of turbines constructed during or prior to August 2009 are based on August 2009 NAIP imagery and turbine locations constructed after August 2009 were based June 2011 NAIP imagery. The location of turbines under construction during June 2011 likely will be less accurate than the location of existing turbines.

This data series contributes to an Online Interactive Energy Atlas developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (http://my.usgs.gov/eerma/). The Energy Atlas synthesizes data on existing and potential energy development in Colorado and New Mexico and includes additional natural resource data layers. This information may be used by decisionmakers to evaluate and compare the potential benefits and tradeoffs associated with different energy development strategies or scenarios. Interactive maps, downloadable data layers, comprehensive metadata, and decision-support tools also are included in the Energy Atlas. The format of the Energy Atlas is designed to facilitate the integration of information about energy with key terrestrial and aquatic resources for evaluating resource values and minimizing risks from energy development.

Publication Title: 

Locations and attributes of wind turbines in Colorado, 2011

Authors: 
Carr, N., J. Diffendorfer, T. Fancher, N. Latysh, K. Leib, and A. Matherne
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2012-10-25
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0055 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

This dataset represents an update to U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 597. Locations and attributes of wind turbines in Colorado, 2009 (available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/597/). This updated Colorado wind turbine Data Series provides geospatial data for all 1,204 wind turbines established within the State of Colorado as of September 2011, an increase of 297 wind turbines from 2009.

Attributes specific to each turbine include: turbine location, manufacturer and model, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, potential megawatt output, land ownership, county, and development status of the wind turbine. Wind energy facility data for each turbine include: facility name, facility power capacity, number of turbines associated with each facility to date, facility developer, facility ownership, and year the facility went online. The locations of turbines are derived from 1-meter true-color aerial photographs produced by the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP); the photographs have a positional accuracy of about ±5 meters. Locations of turbines constructed during or prior to August 2009 are based on August 2009 NAIP imagery and turbine locations constructed after August 2009 were based on September 2011 NAIP imagery. The location of turbines under construction during September 2011 likely will be less accurate than the location of existing turbines.

This data series contributes to an Online Interactive Energy Atlas developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (http://my.usgs.gov/eerma/). The Energy Atlas synthesizes data on existing and potential energy development in Colorado and New Mexico and includes additional natural resource data layers. This information may be used by decisionmakers to evaluate and compare the potential benefits and tradeoffs associated with different energy development strategies or scenarios. Interactive maps, downloadable data layers, comprehensive metadata, and decision-support tools also are included in the Energy Atlas. The format of the Energy Atlas is designed to facilitate the integration of information about energy with key terrestrial and aquatic resources for evaluating resource values and minimizing risks from energy development.

Publication Title: 

Breeding ecology of the Arizona Grasshopper Sparrow

Authors: 
Ruth, J
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2012-11-26
Parent Publication Title: 
Western Field Ornithologists' Annual Meeting, Sept. 26-30, 2012, Petaluma, CA
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0120 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Annual Report for 2011 Wild Horse Research and Field Activities

Authors: 
Ransom, J.I., J.E. Roelle, K.A. Schoenecker, T.A. Mask, and S.S. Germaine
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2012-07-24
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0078 FORT
Species: 

Pub Abstract: 

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