amphibian decline

Legacy ID: 
675

Estimating the Genetic Variability and Spatial Structure of Wood Frogs in Rocky Mountain National Park

Code: 
RB00CNJ
Wood frog embryos in an icy wetland. Photo by Mark Roth, USGS Gallery.
Wood frog embryos in an icy wetland. Photo by Mark Roth, USGS Gallery.
Abstract: 

We investigated genetic structure and levels of genetic diversity in wood frogs in Rocky Mountain National Park, where recent disturbances have altered hydrologic processes and fragmented amphibian habitat. We estimated migration rates among subpopulations, tested for a pattern of isolation-by-distance, and looked for evidence of a recent population bottleneck. We found two subpopulations corresponding to northern and southern areas. Estimates of migration rates among the two subpopulations were low, as were estimates of genetic variability. Conservation of the population of wood frogs may be improved by increasing the spatial distribution of the population and improving gene flow between the subpopulations. Construction or restoration of wetlands in the landscape between the clusters has the potential to address each of these objectives. This research was in collaboration with Colorado State University

Publication Title: 

Modeling habitat connectivity to inform translocation efforts: a case study with the Chiricahua leopard frog

Authors: 
Jarchow, C.J., B.R. Hossack, B.H. Sigafus, C.R. Schwalbe, and E. Muths
Parent Publication Title: 
Journal of Herpetology
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Publication Title: 

Trends in Rocky Mountain amphibians and the role of beaver as a Keystone species

Authors: 
Hossack, B.R., W.R. Gould, D.A. Patla, E. Muths, R. Daley, K. Legg, and P.S. Corn
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Publication Title: 

Trends in amphibian occupancy in the United States

Authors: 
Adams, M.J., D.A.W. Miller, E. Muths, P.S. Corn, E.H. Campbell Grant, L.L Bailey, G.M. Fellers, R.N. Fisher, W.J. Sadinski, H. Waddle, S.C. Walls
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2013-05-29
Parent Publication Title: 
PLoS ONE
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0029 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Though a third of amphibian species worldwide are thought to be imperiled, existing assessments simply categorize extinction risk, providing little information on the rate of population losses. We conducted the first analysis of the rate of change in the probability that amphibians occupy ponds and other comparable habitat features across the United States. We found that overall occupancy by amphibians declined 3.7% annually from 2002 to 2011. Species that are Red-listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) declined an average of 11.6% annually. All subsets of data examined had a declining trend including species in the IUCN Least Concern category. This analysis suggests that amphibian declines may be more widespread and severe than previously realized.

Publication Title: 

The state of amphibians in the United States

Authors: 
Muths, E., M.J. Adams, E.H.C. Grant, D. Miller, P.S. Corn, and L.C. Ball
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2013-05-03
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0132 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

More than 25 years ago, scientists began to identify unexplained declines in amphibian populations around the world. Much has been learned since then, but amphibian declines have not abated and the interactions among the various threats to amphibians are not clear. Amphibian decline is a problem of local, national, and international scope that can affect ecosystem function, biodiversity, and commerce. This fact sheet provides a snapshot of the state of the amphibians and introduces examples to illustrate the range of issues in the United States.

Publication Title: 

Effects of hydroperiod duration on survival, developmental rate, and size at metamorphosis in Boreal Chorus Frog tadpoles (Pseudacris maculata)

Authors: 
Amburgey, S., W.C. Funk, M. Murphy, and E. Muths
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2012-12-03
Parent Publication Title: 
Herpetologica
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0152 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Amphibian Decline: still an unexplained phenomenon - from the rain forest to Rocky Mountain National Park

Authors: 
Muths, E. and S. Corn
Updated Date (text): 
2010-11-23
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Publication Title: 

Estimating equivalence with quantile regression

Authors: 
Cade, B.S
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2011-03-24
Parent Publication Title: 
Ecological Applications
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0023 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Equivalence testing and corresponding confidence interval estimates are used to provide more enlightened statistical statements about parameter estimates by relating them to intervals of effect sizes deemed to be of scientific or practical importance rather than just to an effect size of zero. Equivalence tests and confidence interval estimates are based on a null hypothesis that a parameter estimate is either outside (inequivalence hypothesis) or inside (equivalence hypothesis) an equivalence region, depending on the question of interest and assignment of risk...

Publication Title: 

Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative: Rocky Mountain Region

Authors: 
Muths, E
Updated Date (text): 
2009-11-16
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 

Pub Abstract: 

The Department of Interior's Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) is designed to determine where populations of amphibians are present; to monitor specific sentinel populations and to investigate potential causes of decline and deformity. The Rocky Mountain Region of ARMI encompasses Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico. Two USGS-Biological Resource Division Centers initiate and develop ARMI projects in this region.

Publication Title: 

Survey and assessment of amphibian populations in Rocky Mountain National Park

Authors: 
Corn, P.S., M.L. Jennings, and E. Muths
Publication Date: 
1997
Updated Date (text): 
2012-03-26
Parent Publication Title: 
Northwestern Naturalist
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
1997/0068 MESC
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

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