Proceedings, Pages in

Code: 
PRPI
Publication Title: 

Public knowledge of and attitudes toward black-tailed prairie dogs: findings from a survey of eleven western states

Authors: 
Lamb, B.L
Publication Date: 
2003-03
Updated Date (text): 
2010-12-14
Parent Publication Title: 
Colorado Black-tailed Prairie Dog Technical Conference
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
None

Pub Abstract: 

None

Publication Title: 

Forest ecosystem reorganization underway in the Southwestern US: a preview of widespread forest changes in the Anthropocene? [Ch 4]

Authors: 
Allen, C.D.
Parent Publication Title: 
Forest Conservation and Management in the Anthropocene: Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 

Pub Abstract: 

Climate change is but one aspect of the Anthropocene, a new epoch in which the effects of human activities have become the predominant force in the global biosphere. More than just an overlay on the traditional concerns of sustainable natural resource management, the uncertainties associated with these effects are creating a “no-analog future” in which much of the existing science relating to the functioning and response of forest ecosystems - which serves as the fundamental basis for current forest management practices and policies - must be reconsidered. In these collected papers, leading scientists, resource managers and policy specialists explore the implications of climate change and other manifestations of the Anthropocene on the management of wildlife habitat, biodiversity, water, and other resources, with particular attention to the effects of wildfire. Recommendations include the need for a supporting institutional, legal, and policy framework that is not just different but more dynamic, to facilitate resource management adaptation and preparedness in a period of accelerating environmental change.

Publication Title: 

Will a changing climate increase interaction between rare and non-native plant species in Alaska?

Authors: 
Flagstad, L., M.L. Carlson, H. Cortés-Burns, C. Jarnevich, T. Holcombe
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2012-07-05
Parent Publication Title: 
Conserving Plant Biodiversity in a Changing World: A View from NW North America, Seattle, WA, 13-14 March, 2012
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Structure, composition, and diversity of floodplain vegetation along the Elwha River

Authors: 
Shafroth, P.B., C. Hartt, L.G. Perry, J. Braatne, R.L. Brown, and A. Clausen
Updated Date (text): 
2012-04-11
Parent Publication Title: 
Elwha River Science Symposium. September 15-16, 2011. Port Angeles, WA
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Vegetation of the Elwha River estuary

Authors: 
Shafroth, P.B., T.L. Fuentes, C. Pritekel, M. Beirne, and V.B. Beauchamp
Updated Date (text): 
2012-08-10
Parent Publication Title: 
Elwha River Science Symposium. September 15-16, 2011. Port Angeles, WA
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Longitudinal and temporal variation in plant species richness along the Elwha River: effects of dams and recent flooding

Authors: 
Clausen, A., R.L. Brown, and P.B. Shafroth
Updated Date (text): 
2012-04-11
Parent Publication Title: 
Elwha River Science Symposium. September 15-16, 2011. Port Angeles, WA
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Potential vegetation development in two drained reservoirs after dam removal on the Elwha River: Implications for revegetation

Authors: 
Chenoweth, J., S. Acker, K. Ewing, R. Brown, and P. Shafroth
Updated Date (text): 
2012-04-11
Parent Publication Title: 
Elwha River Science Symposium. September 15-16, 2011. Port Angeles, WA
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Causes, management, and the future of exotic riparian plant invasion in Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona

Authors: 
Reynolds, L.V. and D. J. Cooper
Publication Date: 
2010
Updated Date (text): 
2013-05-03
Parent Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the Colorado River Basin Science and Resource Management Symposium, November 18–20, 2008, Scottsdale, Arizona
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2010/0133 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

In the Southwestern United States, two exotic plant invaders of riparian habitats are tamarisk (Tamarix ramosissima Ledebour, T. chinensis Loureiro, and their hybrids) and Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia L.). These plants were introduced by humans throughout the Southwest around 1900, and their success spreading across the region has coincided with human land-management activities such as river regulation. Both tamarisk and Russian olive have invaded Canyon de Chelly National Monument in Arizona. We addressed three broad research topics: the history of invasion, seedling establishment
requirements, and the effectiveness of exotic plant removals. Our results indicate that the majority of tamarisk and Russian olives established in the mid to late 1980s, long after the original plantings and dam construction in Canyon de Chelly. This suggests that exotic plant invasion is most closely tied to precipitation and available seedling habitat, rather than river regulation or purposeful plantings...

Publication Title: 

Long-Term Observations of Boreal Toads at an ARMI Apex Site

Authors: 
Corn, P.S., E. Muths, and D.S. Pilliod
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2012-08-10
Parent Publication Title: 
Questioning Greater Yellowstone’s Future: Climate, Land Use, and Invasive Species. Proceedings of the 10th Biennial Scientific Conference on the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. October 11–13, 2010, Yellowstone National Park, WY, and Laramie, WY
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0156 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

The U.S. Geological Survey’s Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) is a national project with goals to monitor the status and trends of amphibians, conduct research on causes of declines, and provide information and support to management agencies for conservation of amphibian populations. ARMI activities are organized around extensive inventories and place-based monitoring (such as collaboration with the Greater Yellowstone Inventory and Monitoring Network), and intensive population studies and research at selected locations (apex sites). One such site is an oxbow pond on the Buffalo Fork near the Black Rock Ranger Station east of Grand Teton National Park. We have been conducting mark-recapture of boreal toads (Anaxyrus boreas) at Black Rock since 2002. In concert with studies of other toad populations in the Rocky Mountains, we have documented a high rate of incidence of the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and a negative rate of growth of the toad population, but not the population crash or extinction observed in other populations with high prevalence of Bd...

Publication Title: 

Weathering rates in alpine catchments of central Colorado, USA

Authors: 
Wanty, R.B., P.L. Verplanck, C. Bern, C.A. San Juan, E.H. DeWitt, T.L. Klein, D. Fey, T.S. Schmidt, and S.E. Church
Publication Date: 
2010
Updated Date (text): 
2012-01-04
Parent Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the 13th International Symposium on WaterRock Interaction (2010) 16-20 August, 2010 Guanajuato, Mexico
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
NONCTR/00364
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

Streams were sampled in central Colorado, USA, to provide a geochemical baseline and eva- luate the regional effect of catchment lithology on stream-water chemistry. Drainage from abandoned histori- cal mines, as well as the natural weathering of hydrothermally altered rocks, causes some streams to have low pH and high concentrations of metals and sulfate (acid-rock drainage, or ARD). In the absence of these ef- fects, weathering of some lithologic groups has subtle but important influences on water chemistry. In the presence of ARD, greater concentrations of alkali metals and alkaline earths are observed, but their contribu- tion to the total element load is diminished as Fe, Al, and SO4 constitute a greater proportion of the total load below pH5. In the absence of ARD, drainages from certain highly weatherable lithologic groups have greater chemical weathering rates. Median chemical weathering rates for all sites was 11,500 kg a-1 km-2. In the ab- sence of ARD, median weathering rate was 5,400 kg a-1 km-2, which is lower than published rates in wetter climates.

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