Bat ecology and public health surveillance for rabies in an urbanizing region of Colorado

Product Type: 

Journal Article

Year: 

2011

Author(s): 

O’Shea, T.J., D.J. Neubaum, M.A. Neubaum, P.M. Cryan, L.E. Ellison, T.R. Stanley, C.E. Rupprecht, W.J. Pape, and R.A. Bowen

Suggested Citation: 

O’Shea, T.J., D.J. Neubaum, M.A. Neubaum, P.M. Cryan, L.E. Ellison, T.R. Stanley, C.E. Rupprecht, W.J. Pape, and R.A. Bowen. 2011. Bat ecology and public health surveillance for rabies in an urbanizing region of Colorado. Urban Ecosystems. 14(4): 665-697.

We describe use of Fort Collins, Colorado, and nearby areas by bats in 2001–2005, and link patterns in bat ecology with concurrent public health surveillance for rabies. Our analyses are based on evaluation of summary statistics, and information-theoretic support for results of simple logistic regression. Based on captures in mist nets, the city bat fauna differed from that of the adjacent mountains, and was dominated by big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus). Species, age, and sex composition of bats submitted for rabies testing locally and along the urbanizing Front Range Corridor were similar to those of the mist-net captures and reflected the annual cycle of reproduction and activity of big brown bats. Few submissions occurred November- March, when these bats hibernated elsewhere...