Alphacoronaviruses in New World bats: Prevalence, persistence, phylogeny, and potential for interaction with humans

Product Type: 

Journal Article

Year: 

2011

Author(s): 

Osborne, C., P. Cryan, T.J. O’Shea, L.M. Oko, C. Ndaluka, C.H. Calisher, A. Berglund, M.L. Klavetter, R.A. Bowen, K.V. Holmes, and S.R. Dominguez

Suggested Citation: 

Osborne, C., P. Cryan, T.J. O’Shea, L.M. Oko, C. Ndaluka, C.H. Calisher, A. Berglund, M.L. Klavetter, R.A. Bowen, K.V. Holmes, and S.R. Dominguez. 2011. Alphacoronaviruses in New World bats: Prevalence, persistence, phylogeny, and potential for interaction with humans. PLoS ONE. 6(5): 1-11.

Bats are reservoirs for many different coronaviruses (CoVs) as well as many other important zoonotic viruses. We sampled feces and/or anal swabs of 1,044 insectivorous bats of 2 families and 17 species from 21 different locations within Colorado from 2007 to 2009. We detected alphacoronavirus RNA in bats of 4 species: big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), 10% prevalence; long-legged bats (Myotis volans), 8% prevalence; little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus), 3% prevalence; and western long-eared bats (Myotis evotis), 2% prevalence. Overall, juvenile bats were twice as likely to be positive for CoV RNA as adult bats. At two of the rural sampling sites, CoV RNAs were detected in big brown and long-legged bats during the three sequential summers of this study...