Opinion: Why we need a centralized repository for isotopic data

Product Type: 

Journal Article

Year: 

2017

Author(s): 

Pauli, J.N., S.D. Newsome, J.A. Cook, C. Harrod, S.A. Steffan, C. Baker, M. Ben-David, D. Bloom, G. Brown, T. Cerling, C. Cicero, C. Cook, M. Dohm, J. Eherlinger, S. Federhen, B. Frey, P. Ghosh, G. Graves, R. Gropp, K. Hobson, C. Jordan, S. Pilaar Birch, J. Poelen, S. Ratnasingham, L. Russell, C.A. Stricker, M. Uhen, C. Yarnes, and B. Hayden.

Suggested Citation: 

Pauli, J.N., S.D. Newsome, J.A. Cook, C. Harrod, S.A. Steffan, C. Baker, M. Ben-David, D. Bloom, G. Brown, T. Cerling, C. Cicero, C. Cook, M. Dohm, J. Eherlinger, S. Federhen, B. Frey, P. Ghosh, G. Graves, R. Gropp, K. Hobson, C. Jordan, S. Pilaar Birch, J. Poelen, S. Ratnasingham, L. Russell, C.A. Stricker, M. Uhen, C. Yarnes, and B. Hayden. 2017. Why we need a centralized repository for isotopic data. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science 114(12): 2997-3001. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1701742114

Stable isotopes encode and integrate the origin of matter; thus, their analysis offers tremendous potential to address questions across diverse scientific disciplines (1, 2). Indeed, the broad applicability of stable isotopes, coupled with advancements in high-throughput analysis, have created a scientific field that is growing exponentially, and generating data at a rate paralleling the explosive rise of DNA sequencing and genomics (3). Centralized data repositories, such as GenBank, have become increasingly important as a means for archiving information, and “Big Data” analytics of these resources are revolutionizing science and everyday life.

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Craig Stricker
Craig Stricker