Washington

Legacy ID: 
52
State Code: 
WA
Country Code: 
USA
Area: 
67 290.10
Latitude: 
47.38
Longitude: 
-120.43

Examining Range-wide Connectivity in White-tailed Ptarmigan

Code: 
RB00CNJ.26.3
A White-tailed Ptarmigan on Mt. Evans in Colorado. Photo by Cameron Aldridge, USGS.
A White-tailed Ptarmigan on Mt. Evans in Colorado. Photo by Cameron Aldridge, USGS.
Abstract: 

The goal of this study is to document levels of connectivity among white-tailed ptarmigan populations. Our preliminary results, based on microsatellite loci, revealed that there is significant population genetic structure throughout the species’ range. The Colorado and Vancouver Island populations were the most isolated and there was limited connectivity among populations in Alaska, the Yukon, Washington, and Montana. There is little evidence for movement from Colorado northward or from Vancouver Island eastward, raising concerns for the long term viability of two subspecies. As these areas are most impacted by climate change, this lack of connectivity to the core part of the range may have implications for the species’ ability to track shifting habitats due to warming climates.

Publication Title: 

Large-scale dam removal on the Elwha River, Washington, USA: River channel and floodplain geomorphic change

Authors: 
East, A.E., G.R. Pess, J.A. Bountry, C.S. Magirl, A.C. Ritchie, J.B. Logan, T.J. Randle, M.C. Mastin, J.T. Minear, J.J. Duda, M.C. Liermann, M.L. McHenry, T.J. Beechie, and P.B. Shafroth
Publication Date: 
2015
Parent Publication Title: 
Geomorphology
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2015/0001 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Biomonitoring of environmental status & trends (BEST) program: environmental contaminants and their effects on fish in the Columbia River Basin

Authors: 
Hinck, J.E., C.J. Schmitt, T.M. Bartish, N.D. Denslow, V.S. Blazer, P.J. Anderson, J.J. Coyle, G.M. Dethloff and D.E. Tillitt
Publication Date: 
2004
Parent Publication Title: 
U.S. Geological Survey
Archive number: 
2004/0127 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

This project examined and analyzed 560 fish representing eight species from 16 sites in the Columbia River Basin (CRB) from September 1997 to April 1998. Ten of the 16 sampling locations were historical National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program (NCBP) sites where organochlorine and elemental contaminants in fish had been monitored from 1969 through 1986. Five sites were co-located at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)-National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) stations at which water quality is monitored. The sampling location at Marine Park in Vancouver, Washington did not correspond to either of the established monitoring programs. Eight of the sampling locations were located on the Columbia River; three were on the Snake River; two were on the Willamette River, and one site was on each of the Yakima, Salmon and Flathead Rivers. Common carp (Cyprinus carpio), black basses (Micropterus sp.), and largescale sucker (Catostomus macrocheilus) together accounted for 80% of the fish sampled during the study. Fish were weighed and measured then field-examined for external and internal lesions, and liver, spleen, and gonads were weighed to compute somatic indices. Selected tissues and fluids were obtained and preserved for analysis of fish health and reproductive biomarkers. Composite samples of whole fish from each station were grouped by species and gender and analyzed for persistent organic and inorganic contaminants and for dioxin-like activity using H4IIE rat hepatoma cell bioassay.

Publication Title: 

Environmental contaminants and biomarker responses in fish from the Columbia River and its tributaries: Spatial and temporal trends

Authors: 
Hinck, J.E., C.J. Schmitt, V.S. Blazer, N.D. Denslow, T.M. Bartish, P.J. Anderson, J.J. Coyle, G.M. Dethloff, and D.E. Tillitt
Publication Date: 
2006
Parent Publication Title: 
Science of the Total Environment
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2006/0214 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Public Participation GIS - PPGIS (v.1)

Authors: 
Reed, P.R., G. Montgomery, S. Dawson, D. Brown
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2013-06-03
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Western Energy Citation Clearinghouse, Version 1.0 [Web Application]

Authors: 
Montag, J.M., C. Willis, L. Glavin, M.K., Eberhardt Frank, A.L. Everette, K. Peterson, S. Nicoud, and A. Novacek
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2013-05-29
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0028 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

ASPN – Assessing Socioeconomic Planning Needs (v.1)

Authors: 
Richardson, L., A.L. Everette, S. Dawson
Publication Date: 
2015
Updated Date (text): 
2012-06-22
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0049 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

ASPN is a Web-based decision tool that assists natural resource managers and planners in identifying and prioritizing social and economic planning issues, and provides guidance on appropriate social and economic methods to address their identified issues.

  • ASPN covers the breadth of issues facing natural resource management agencies so it is widely applicable for various resources, plans, and projects.
  • ASPN also realistically accounts for budget and planning time constraints by providing estimated costs and time lengths needed for each of the possible social and economic methods.

ASPN is a valuable starting point for natural resource managers and planners to start working with their agencies’ social and economic specialists. Natural resource management actions have social and economic effects that often require appropriate analyses. Additionally, in the United States, Federal agencies are legally mandated to follow guidance under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which requires addressing social and economic effects for actions that may cause biophysical impacts. Most natural resource managers and planners lack training in understanding the full range of potential social and economic effects of a management decision as well as an understanding of the variety of methods and analyses available to address these effects. Thus, ASPN provides a common framework which provides consistency within and across natural resource management agencies to assist in identification of pertinent social and economic issues while also allowing the social and economic analyses to be tailored to best meet the needs of the specific plan or project.

ASPN can be used throughout a planning process or be used as a tool to identify potential issues that may be applicable to future management actions. ASPN is useful during the pre-scoping phase as a tool to start thinking about potential social and economic issues as well as to identify potential stakeholders who may be affected. Thinking about this early in the planning process can help with outreach efforts and with understanding the cost and time needed to address the potential social and economic effects. One can use ASPN during the scoping and post-scoping phases as a way to obtain guidance on how to address issues that stakeholders identified. ASPN can also be used as a monitoring tool to identify whether new social and economic issues arise after a management action occurs.

ASPN is developed through a collaborative research effort between the USGS Fort Collins Science Center’s (FORT) Social and Economic Analysis (SEA) Branch and the U.S. Forest Service, the National Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  ASPN’s technical development is led by the USGS FORT’s Information Science Branch.  An updated release, which will extend ASPN’s functionality and incorporate feature improvements identified in ongoing usability testing, is currently in the planning stages.

Publication Title: 

Feathers [Website]

Authors: 
Oyler-McCance, S.J., B.C. Fedy, T.W. Miller, M.K. Eberhardt Frank, and G.A. Montgomery
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2012-10-31
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0040 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Feathers is a collaborative Sage-grouse connectivity study to examine gene flow across the range-wide distribution of greater sage-grouse is being initiated in collaboration with the Natural Resources Conservation Service through the Sage-Grouse Initiative, the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, the USDA Forest Service, and the US Geological Survey. The goal of this study is to collect fine-scale genetic data from greater sage-grouse feathers collected at breeding locations (leks) throughout the entire range covering 11 states and 2 provinces. Over 5,000 leks are currently mapped and visited each year for population monitoring.

Publication Title: 

Structure, composition, and diversity of floodplain vegetation along the Elwha River

Authors: 
Shafroth, P.B., C. Hartt, L.G. Perry, J. Braatne, R.L. Brown, and A. Clausen
Updated Date (text): 
2012-04-11
Parent Publication Title: 
Elwha River Science Symposium. September 15-16, 2011. Port Angeles, WA
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Vegetation of the Elwha River estuary

Authors: 
Shafroth, P.B., T.L. Fuentes, C. Pritekel, M. Beirne, and V.B. Beauchamp
Updated Date (text): 
2012-08-10
Parent Publication Title: 
Elwha River Science Symposium. September 15-16, 2011. Port Angeles, WA
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

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