New York

Legacy ID: 
36
State Code: 
NY
Country Code: 
USA
Area: 
48 561.80
Latitude: 
42.95
Longitude: 
-75.51
Publication Title: 

Recreation-related perceptions of natural resource managers in the Saranac Lakes Wild Forest area

FORT Contact: 
Rudy Schuster
Authors: 
Kuehn, D., M. Mink, and R.M. Schuster
Related Staff: 
Rudy Schuster
Publication Date: 
2007
Updated Date (text): 
2009-03-27
Parent Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the 2006 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
NonCTR/00139
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

Public forest managers often work with diverse stakeholder groups as they implement forest management policies. Within the Saranac Lakes Wild Forest area of New York State’s Adirondack Park, stakeholder groups such as visitors, business owners, and landowners often have conflicting perceptions about issues related to water-based recreation in the region’s public forest areas. The main objective of this study is to identify the beliefs and attitudes of managers in the Saranac Lakes Wild Forest area regarding issues related to boat use…

Publication Title: 

Insect prey eaten by Hoary Bats (Lasiurus cinereus) prior to fatal collisions with wind turbines

FORT Contact: 
Ernest Valdez
Authors: 
Valdez, E.W., and P.M. Cryan
Related Staff: 
Ernest Valdez
Paul Cryan
Publication Date: 
2013
Updated Date (text): 
2014-01-13
Parent Publication Title: 
Western North American Naturalist
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2013/0083 FORT
States: 
Topics: 

Pub Abstract: 

Wind turbines are being deployed all across the world to meet the growing demand for energy, and in many areas, these turbines are causing the deaths of insectivorous migratory bats. One of the hypothesized causes of bat susceptibility is that bats are attracted to insects on or near the turbines. We examined insect remains in the stomachs and intestines of hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus) found dead beneath wind turbines in New York and Texas to evaluate the hypothesis that bats die while feeding at turbines. Most of the bats we examined had full stomachs, indicating that they fed in the minutes to hours leading up to their deaths. However, we did not find prey in the mouths or throats of any bats that would indicate the bats died while capturing prey. Hoary bats fed mostly on moths, but we also detected the regular presence of beetles, true bugs, and crickets. Presence of terrestrial insects in stomachs indicates that bats may have gleaned them from the ground or the turbine surfaces, yet aerial capture of winged insect stages cannot be ruled out. Our findings confirm earlier studies that indicate hoary bats feed during migration and eat mostly moths. Future studies on bat behaviors and insect presence at wind turbines could help determine whether feeding at turbines is a major fatality risk for bats.

Publication Title: 

Carcass ecology: Forensic techniques shed light on the possible causes of bat susceptibility to turbines

FORT Contact: 
Paul Cryan
Authors: 
Cryan, P., E. Valdez, C. Stricker, M. Wunder, R. Barclay, E. Baerwald, C. Willis, J. Jameson, E. A. Snider, and E. Crichton
Related Staff: 
Paul Cryan
Ernest Valdez
Craig Stricker
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2012-11-26
Parent Publication Title: 
The Wildlife Society 19th annual conference, Portland, OR, 14 October 2012
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0125 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

ASPN – Assessing Socioeconomic Planning Needs (v.1)

FORT Contact: 
Lance Everette
Authors: 
Richardson, L., A.L. Everette, S. Dawson
Related Staff: 
Leslie Richardson
Lance Everette
Jessica Montag
Lynne Koontz
Kate Peterson
Sebastien Nicoud
Publication Date: 
2015
Updated Date (text): 
2012-06-22
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0049 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

ASPN is a Web-based decision tool that assists natural resource managers and planners in identifying and prioritizing social and economic planning issues, and provides guidance on appropriate social and economic methods to address their identified issues.

  • ASPN covers the breadth of issues facing natural resource management agencies so it is widely applicable for various resources, plans, and projects.
  • ASPN also realistically accounts for budget and planning time constraints by providing estimated costs and time lengths needed for each of the possible social and economic methods.

ASPN is a valuable starting point for natural resource managers and planners to start working with their agencies’ social and economic specialists. Natural resource management actions have social and economic effects that often require appropriate analyses. Additionally, in the United States, Federal agencies are legally mandated to follow guidance under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which requires addressing social and economic effects for actions that may cause biophysical impacts. Most natural resource managers and planners lack training in understanding the full range of potential social and economic effects of a management decision as well as an understanding of the variety of methods and analyses available to address these effects. Thus, ASPN provides a common framework which provides consistency within and across natural resource management agencies to assist in identification of pertinent social and economic issues while also allowing the social and economic analyses to be tailored to best meet the needs of the specific plan or project.

ASPN can be used throughout a planning process or be used as a tool to identify potential issues that may be applicable to future management actions. ASPN is useful during the pre-scoping phase as a tool to start thinking about potential social and economic issues as well as to identify potential stakeholders who may be affected. Thinking about this early in the planning process can help with outreach efforts and with understanding the cost and time needed to address the potential social and economic effects. One can use ASPN during the scoping and post-scoping phases as a way to obtain guidance on how to address issues that stakeholders identified. ASPN can also be used as a monitoring tool to identify whether new social and economic issues arise after a management action occurs.

ASPN is developed through a collaborative research effort between the USGS Fort Collins Science Center’s (FORT) Social and Economic Analysis (SEA) Branch and the U.S. Forest Service, the National Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  ASPN’s technical development is led by the USGS FORT’s Information Science Branch.  An updated release, which will extend ASPN’s functionality and incorporate feature improvements identified in ongoing usability testing, is currently in the planning stages.

Publication Title: 

Lights, camera, action: behaviors of hibernating bats before and after WNS revealed by surveillance video

FORT Contact: 
Paul Cryan
Authors: 
Cryan, P., J. Boyles, G. McCracken, K. Castle, D. Dalton, J. Yanez, J. Beeler, A. Wilson, A. Hicks, C. Herzog, R. vonLinden, S. Johnson, C. Hudson, T. Shier, and J. Coleman
Related Staff: 
Paul Cryan
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2012-06-20
Parent Publication Title: 
Annual White-nose Syndrome Symposium, 6 June, 2012, Madison, Wisconsin
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0044 FORT

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

White-nose Syndrome Disease Tracking System (v.1)

FORT Contact: 
Lance Everette
Authors: 
Everette, A.L., P.M. Cryan, and K. Peterson
Related Staff: 
Lance Everette
Paul Cryan
Kate Peterson
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2012-12-28
Parent Publication Title: 
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0134 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

A Devastating Disease

White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an emerging and devastating disease of hibernating bats in North America. WNS is caused by a cold-growing fungus (Geomyces destructans) that infects the skin of hibernating bats during winter and causes life-threatening alterations in physiology and behavior. WNS has spread rapidly across the eastern United States and Canada since it was first documented in New York in the winter of 2006.  This new disease is causing mass mortality and detrimentally affecting most of the 6 species of bats that hibernate in the northeastern United States. Particularly hard-hit are the little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus), northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis), eastern small-footed bat (Myotis leibii), and federally endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). Several more species are also now known to be exposed to the fungus in the Midwest and Southeast. The sudden and widespread mortality associated with white-nose syndrome is unprecedented in any of the world’s bats and is a cause for international concern as the fungus and the disease spread farther north, south, and west.  Loss of these long-lived insect-eating bats could have substantial adverse effects on agriculture and forestry through loss of natural pest-control services.

Tracking a Deadly Disease

Because WNS is spreading so rapidly, field surveillance data and diagnostic samples must be managed efficiently so that critical information can be communicated quickly among State and Federal land managers, as well as the public. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which plays a primary role in coordinating the Federal response to WNS, worked with the USGS Fort Collins Science Center’s Web Applications Team to develop the White-nose Syndrome Disease Tracking System. Version 1.0 of this system, released for Beta testing in May 2011, addresses two critical objectives:

  • enable state-level resource managers to effectively manage WNS field and laboratory data, and
  • provide customizable map and data reports of surveillance findings. The WNS Disease Tracking System subsequently was demonstrated to resource managers involved in the WNS response, and system users are assisting with in-depth testing. Once resource-management users are all trained (autumn 2011), they will begin populating the system with surveillance data, much of which will be immediately available to the public.

WNS version 1.0 was released into production in November, 2011 and state points-of-contact are currently being trainined. New users are providing ciritical feedback for WNS version 2.0, which is currently being planned with Fish and Wildlife Region 5 and the National White-nose Syndrome Data Management Team.

Key System Components

  • Disease Tracking: Customizable disease tracking maps and data exports for all U.S. states and counties
  • Disease Reporting: Tissue sample database management for authorized resource managers as well as a publicly accessible database of disease reporting contacts for all U.S. States and Federal resource management agencies
  • Diagnostic Labs:  Directory of laboratories involved in white-nose syndrome diagnostic analyses
Publication Title: 

Migratory structure and geographic origins of hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus) inferred from stable isotope analysis

FORT Contact: 
Paul Cryan
Authors: 
Cryan, P.M., C.A. Stricker, and M.B. Wunder
Related Staff: 
Paul Cryan
Craig Stricker
Mike Wunder
Publication Date: 
2010
Updated Date (text): 
2012-05-30
Parent Publication Title: 
15th International Bat Research Conference, Prague, Czech Republic 22-27 August 2010
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2010/0129 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Migratory structure and geographic origins of hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus) inferred from stable isotope analysis

FORT Contact: 
Paul Cryan
Authors: 
Cryan, P.M., C.A. Stricker, and M.B. Wunder
Related Staff: 
Paul Cryan
Craig Stricker
Mike Wunder
Publication Date: 
2010
Updated Date (text): 
2011-12-14
Parent Publication Title: 
90th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mammalogists Laramie, WY 11-15 June 2010
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2010/0130 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 
Publication Title: 

Evidence of late-summer mating readiness and early sexual maturation in migratory tree-roosting bats found dead at wind turbines

FORT Contact: 
Paul Cryan
Authors: 
Cryan, P.M., J.W. Jameson, E.F. Baerwald, C.K.R. Willis, R.M.R. Barclay, E. Snider, and E.G. Crichton
Related Staff: 
Paul Cryan
E. Apple Snider
Publication Date: 
2012
Updated Date (text): 
2013-05-03
Parent Publication Title: 
PLoS ONE
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2012/0104 FORT
States: 

Pub Abstract: 

Understanding animal mating systems is an important component of their conservation, yet the precise mating times for many species of bats are unknown. The aim of this study was to better understand the details and timing of reproductive events in species of bats that die most frequently at wind turbines in North America, because such information can help inform conservation strategies. We examined the reproductive anatomy of hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus), eastern red bats (L. borealis), and silver-haired bats (Lasionycteris noctivagans) found dead beneath industrial-scale wind turbines to learn more about when they mate. We evaluated 103 L. cinereus, 18 L. borealis, and 47 Ln. noctivagans from wind energy facilities in the United States and Canada. Histological analysis revealed that most male L. cinereus and L. borealis, as well as over half the Ln. noctivagans examined had sperm in the caudae epididymides by late August, indicating readiness to mate. Testes regression in male hoary bats coincided with enlargement of seminal vesicles and apparent growth of keratinized spines on the glans penis. Seasonality of these processes also suggests that mating could occur during August in L. cinereus. Spermatozoa were found in the uterus of an adult female hoary bat collected in September, but not in any other females. Ovaries of all females sampled had growing secondary or tertiary follicles, indicating sexual maturity even in first-year females. Lasiurus cinereus, L. borealis, and Ln. noctivagans are the only North American temperate bats in which most first-year young of both sexes are known to sexually mature in their first autumn. Our findings provide the first detailed information published on the seasonal timing of mating readiness in these species most affected by wind turbines.

Publication Title: 

New Developments in Instream Flow Science and Tools at the Fort Collins Science Center [Poster]

FORT Contact: 
Terry Waddle
Authors: 
Waddle, T.J., L. Hanson, C. Holmquist-Johnson, G.T. Auble, and D. Walters
Related Staff: 
Terry Waddle
Leanne Hanson
Chris Holmquist-Johnson
Gregor Auble
David Walters
Publication Date: 
2011
Updated Date (text): 
2012-04-27
Parent Publication Title: 
FLOW 2011: Instream Flow Valuation in Public Decision-Making, May 2-4, 2011, in Nashville, TN
Publication Type: 
Archive number: 
2011/0163 FORT

Pub Abstract: 

Pages